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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1864., [Electronic resource] 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Dearing or search for Dearing in all documents.

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iday, briefly alluded to in our last, was, as then stated, an attempt to surprise our forces on the Squirrel Level road. Some four hundred of them rushed into our lines from the direction of Davis's dwelling, on the railroad, and succeeded in capturing some ten of our pickets. They then commenced their depredations upon citizens in the vicinity, and are reported to have carried off one or two as prisoners. When within one mile and a half of the Boydton plankroad, they were opened upon by Dearing's cavalry brigade, who, with the aid of a howitzer, soon caused a hasty retreat. The Yankees fled to their strongholds on the railroad, where they reformed; and, being heavily reinforced, started up Vaughan's road with the apparent purpose of reaching the Southside railroad in that direction. They had not proceeded far, however, before they ran afoul of a brigade of Hampton's cavalry, and were again compelled to take the back track. Since that time they have made no further demonstration
From Petersburg. [from our own correspondent.] Petersburg, Virginia, September 3, 1864. Heavy musketry, accompanied by occasional discharges of artillery, were heard on our extreme right yesterday morning, and indicated, quite unmistakably, active operations in that direction.--The firing turned out to have been an encounter between Dearing's cavalry and a body of the enemy's cavalry, estimated at fifteen hundred strong, accompanied by four pieces of artillery, provided with rations and forage for three days. Their object was doubtless, a raid in the direction of the Southside railroad. They found, however, our boys on the qui vive; and after driving in the pickets, came upon a body of our reserves, who engaged and drove them back pell-mell towards their own lines. In their retreat they threw away canteens, side-arms, sabres, and scattered "their oats" in every direction.--Our loss was a few horses; we captured a few prisoners. Our lines have been re-established, and all