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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 166 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 114 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 91 9 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 78 2 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 77 7 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 45 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 15, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hardee or search for Hardee in all documents.

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31 the enemy advanced in heavy force against the position which General Hardee held at Jonesboro' in accordance with orders. A severe and most terrible battle ensued during the day. General Hardee being in command of the two corps in position, placed his own corps in charge of Clebuorces in Atlanta. Thus a large amount of the effective strength of Hardee's command was withdrawn and his line fearfully weakened. Earlys, led in person by Sherman, advanced on the enfeebled line hold by Hardee's command.--Then ensued the hardest fought battle of the war.--The veterans of that brave old soldier, Hardee — men who had never been defeated on any field — stood grimly, and fought with unsurpassed bravery ith the destruction their enfilading fire was producing, caused General Hardee to withdraw to Lovejoy's station. This movement was consum most terrible odds, that the Army of Tennessee has yet engaged in. Hardee's corps fought alone against almost the entire Yankee army, immedia