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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1864., [Electronic resource] 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Dearing or search for Dearing in all documents.

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nesday morning with Barringer's, Chambliss's, Rosser's and Dearing's brigades of cavalry, and Graham's and McGregor's batteri protected by a series of breastworks and rifle-pits. General Dearing the right, simultaneously, and with like result. The represented to have been faultless. On the enemy's right, Dearing's men swept like an avalanche over their works, meeting winabled to make comparatively but a feeble resistance. General Dearing took thirty-five prisoners, five or six teams, and thetate manner. It was here that the men who fled before General Dearing were made to surrender. General Rosser took about twos camp. The prisoners captured by Generals Rosser and Dearing belonged to the First District of Columbia cavalry, comman forces started on their return home. Generals Rosser and Dearing were in the advance of the captures, and General Lee brougand it was found necessary to give him battle. Rosser and Dearing were ordered to attack at once, which they did in the most