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tting races have been substituted for the genuine sports of the turf. We have not been slow to imitate, and the consequence has been that blood horses have become a rarity throughout the South. In the days of the old revolution, horses of high blood were much more common than they have ever been since. Everybody seems to have owned a blooded horse. When Cornwallis passed through those portions of the State that lie between the Tidewater region and the county of Albemarle, Tarlton and Simcoe (especially the former) swept the stables and pastures. So successful was Tarlton, especially in his several raids upon the farmers and planters, that a contemporary writer says his whole command was mounted upon race horses. Of these, no doubt, he imported many from England, but many more he got from the stables of Virginia gentlemen. The steed upon which he himself was mounted was the most famous racer of the day. He was called "Black- and-all-Black," and belonged to a gentleman whose n