hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 33 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 29 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 10 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 5 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 6, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Burbridge or search for Burbridge in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 1 document section:

The Reserves immortalized themselves at Saltville. They routed Burbridge and all his "niggers," horse, foot and dragoon. Abundant as the article was in that region, they could not put a grain of salt on the tails of the flying blackbirds. The coat-tails, we mean, which stuck out so straight that little boys might have played marbles on them. Burbridge, we believe, was once a great racer and breeder of horses. He never had a racer that could make such time as the asses he led to sla might be turned into pillars of salt. The country, and the abundance of the commodity, no doubt suggested the doubt. Burbridge and his rascally crew took "a salt eel for their dinner" and then left the drins. The country has since been infested udge that the salt has lost its savor, otherwise there would not be such a "melodious smell" in the neighborhood. Poor Burbridge. Echols treated him after a very uncourteous fashion.--He salted him first and then licked him. That munificent p