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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1860., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 6, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Reed or search for Reed in all documents.

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er get out of here; " upon which a fist and skull fight commenced between one of the soldiers and one of the citizens. A man by the name of Sanford was fighting with a soldier, and had knocked him back, very nearly down, when a man by the name of Reed started up to where they were fighting, and at the same time commenced drawing his revolver, which hung in the scabbard. Another soldier, seeing this, drew his revolver and shot Reed through the heart, from which he died in a few minutes.--SeveraReed through the heart, from which he died in a few minutes.--Several volleys were then exchanged between the citizens and soldiers, resulting in wounding Sanford in the arm and thigh. None of the soldiers, were hurt. These are the facts as near as I can learn them. So soon as it was known that a disturbance had occurred, the military was at once called out and order again restored. None of the soldiers on duty were in the difficulty — but some soldiers that were at home on furlough. P. S.--Since writing the above, I understand that Sanford admits t