Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Forrest or search for Forrest in all documents.

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ispatches have been received from General Breckinridge stating that a portion of the enemy's cavalry, after slight resistance, has been driven back from Kingsport towards Rogersville, and that there is no enemy this side of Jonesboro'. From Forrest. Forrest, as usual, is doing well. On last Monday he appeared before Dalton, Georgia, and demanded its surrender. Northern papers report him across the Tennessee river. Brigadier-General Adam R. Johnson. This gallant officer, who Forrest, as usual, is doing well. On last Monday he appeared before Dalton, Georgia, and demanded its surrender. Northern papers report him across the Tennessee river. Brigadier-General Adam R. Johnson. This gallant officer, who established the new department in Kentucky, and was so unfortunate as to be wounded and captured a short time since, and who has been reported as dead, is, we rejoice to be able to say, improving. He was shot in the left side of the head, the ball taking out the left eye, cutting the bridge of the nose, and it was feared fatally injuring the sight of the other eye. Late accounts from him say that he will recover the sight of the right eye entirely. From Georgia. Northern dates of the
A friend furnished us with a New York Herald of the 7th. A dispatch to the Herald, dated Nashville, October 6th says: The rebel Captain Blackwell, on the 30th ultimo, surprised and captured some guards, numbering thirty-two, at Shelbyville, Tennessee, and burned the railroad depot and a lot of arms and munitions of war. Ten of the Union prisoners were shot by Blackwell near Fayetteville. The balance were delivered to Forrest. Six of the latter escaped, and had reached Shelbyville. One hundred and fifty rebels, under Duval McNairy, attacked Lieutenant Blizzard, of the Fifth Tennessee cavalry, in charge of a large drove of cattle from Johnsonville, within fifteen miles of Nashville. The Union guards numbered sixty, half of whom were killed, wounded or captured. The balance escaped and arrived here safely. There was a stampede of the cattle, and large numbers are straying through the country. A party of fifteen guerrillas, under Lieutenant Herron, of the Second
e the toils, the fortunes, the misfortunes, if it be so, of the army in Georgia. He goes with a single purpose to serve wherever I direct, asking no particular place, desiring no special command, but in the spirit that made a general a corporal, go where I say, and so going, I trust he goes not to bleed but to conquer. (Great applause.) With these hopes I go to Virginia.--Late reverses there have been exaggerated by the telegraph, and the tide of victory is now setting in our favor. Forrest has disposed of the enemy that held him in check so long, and is now going up the river, sweeping onward toward the North, gaining victory after victory, conquering and to conquer. Be of good cheer. In homely phrase, put your shoulder to the wheel, and work while it is day. With this stirring peroration, and a few parting words as to the necessity of defeating the two main Yankee armies before the new levies could come in from the draft, and the duty of Georgia to feed the armie