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The Daily Dispatch: April 18, 1864., [Electronic resource] 22 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 9 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 24, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 2, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Voorhees or search for Voorhees in all documents.

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ich we make to regain what we have so nearly lost. Brute Butler on the Presidency. The tender hearted and affectionate Butler, in a letter to "Deur Comeron, (of Pennsylvania, Lincoln's former Secretary of the of War,) in which he bids adieu to his Democratic friends and takes sides with Lincoln, essays to satisfy his old confreres that there is no difficulty in the way of their voting for Lincoln. He says if they elect McClellan they remit the country to the hands of Vallandigham, Voorhees, Wood, Seymour and others, who, if even they carry on the war, will disband two hundred thousand colored men now doing duty as soldiers. Butler is a trump. This argument will tell amongst Yankees. Two hundred thousand of them have no idea of putting themselves in the places of these negroes! Butler ridicules all idea of debating the negro question of emancipation. It is an idle one; for the armies settle it as they advance. Slavery terminates wherever they appear. He objects with