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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 2 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1864., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 12, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Saltville (Virginia, United States) or search for Saltville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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The recent battle at Saltville. --Our forces at Saltville have buried one hundred and six white Yankees and one hundred and fifty negroes, and have eighty-six of their wounded, as the result of the late fight there. Our own loss is now officially ascertained to be thirteen killed, one hundred and ten wounded, and twenty-three prisoners. A letter in the Petersburg Express, speaking of this battle and the way the reserves behaved, says: "The topography of the country in the immediateSaltville have buried one hundred and six white Yankees and one hundred and fifty negroes, and have eighty-six of their wounded, as the result of the late fight there. Our own loss is now officially ascertained to be thirteen killed, one hundred and ten wounded, and twenty-three prisoners. A letter in the Petersburg Express, speaking of this battle and the way the reserves behaved, says: "The topography of the country in the immediate vicinity of the battle field is mountainous. It is about one mile from the salt works, and a part of it can be distinctly seen from the works. Our reserves, who behaved like veterans, were stationed in a deep valley, and were charged by the Yankee cavalry from the eastern slope of the valley, over a clear field. In this charge we lost twenty-one, who were taken prisoners. The reserves then fell back and occupied the western slope of the valley, which is thickly covered with briars and unde