hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 836 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 532 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 480 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 406 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 350 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 332 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 322 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 310 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 294 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 20, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Missouri (Missouri, United States) or search for Missouri (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Dalton. This we know. Nothing further has been heard from him. We are assured, however, that he is not idle. From Missouri. In Missouri, Price is having everything his own way. The old General said, when he started on his campaign, that heMissouri, Price is having everything his own way. The old General said, when he started on his campaign, that he went there to maintain the Confederate Government in the State, and on his own dear soil, or his bones should be there to whiten on the prairie. He is treading with a determined step. Jeff. Thompson, the wily swamp fox, is on his old trail. He wiourians, Jeff. Thompson would not shoot them; but they were, doubtless, an accursed and thieving set, who have come into Missouri since the war and taken quiet and unlawful possession of the homes of true Missourians, who have either been murdered ornd taken quiet and unlawful possession of the homes of true Missourians, who have either been murdered or are in the Southern army. Missouri will doubtless be redeemed; and any Yankee will rue the day he ever set foot in a Missouri homestead.
Brigadier-General Lewis Cabell, of the Confederate army, who was killed at Pilot Knob, Missouri, was a graduate of West Point, and formerly an officer of the old army. He was a son of the late B. W. S. Cabell, of Pittsylvania county, Virginia, and was well known in Danville. He was once chief quartermaster of the army at Manassas.
ing the night, and a Union infantry force arrived there this morning. The rebels robbed stores of several thousand dollars' worth of clothing, boots, shoes, &c., burned the water station, but did no other injury to the railroad. The rolling stock was all sent to Tipton. Price is reported to be moving on Lexington. Bill Anderson has out the North Missouri railroad at High Hill. He is also reported to have visited Florence. Anderson says his only orders are "to raise hell in North Missouri. " From Louisiana — Another assessment. An arrival from New Orleans furnishes the Yankee papers the following news: General Dana, commanding at Vicksburg, is keeping up a continual series of scouting far into the interior which is productive of much benefit to the national cause. General Hurlbut, commanding the Gulf Department, has assessed an additional twenty-five per cent, aggregating over two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, on the sums subscribed in aid of the reb
ce that time, the gloom has been gradually wearing away, until, at the present moment, they are brighter than they ever have been from the beginning. Grant is at a dead stand here; Price has operated, and is operating still, with such effect in Missouri that the Yankees already talk of abandoning Arkansas and confining their exertions to the redemption of the more important State; while Sherman's situation in Georgia is, to the last degree, precarious. If any of the things which are possible sious. If any of the things which are possible should happen: if Price should reconquer Missouri, and expel the Yankees from it; if Hood should capture or badly cripple Sherman; if Grant's army should suffer a great reverse here before Richmond; we should find the voice of the Yankees as loud for peace as it now is for war. So true is it, that our armies are our only peace-makers, and our successes the only exponent of the terms. Let us but effect any of these objects and we shall have peace.