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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 50 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 48 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 44 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 25 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 23, 1863., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 17 1 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 12 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 14, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Horatio Seymour or search for Horatio Seymour in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

made up their minds whether the rebellion exists at the North or the South--whether it is represented by Jeff. Davis or Seymour — it is to be suppressed--["Bully for you"]--and the greatest triumph we can achieve in this election is in the absolute destruction of Horatio Seymour. I mean the destruction of Seymour and his infernal exhorts, who have raised themselves up against the prosecution of this war since the firing of Fort Seymour. [A voice--"Send him to the State prison."] That is tooSeymour and his infernal exhorts, who have raised themselves up against the prosecution of this war since the firing of Fort Seymour. [A voice--"Send him to the State prison."] That is too good a place for him. [Groans for Seymour.] Mr. Busteed proposed three cheers for Governor Morton, which were given with a hearty good will. "John Brown" was called for, to which some one responded, "Do let John Brown's bones rest for a fSeymour.] Mr. Busteed proposed three cheers for Governor Morton, which were given with a hearty good will. "John Brown" was called for, to which some one responded, "Do let John Brown's bones rest for a few minutes." [Cheers and laughter.] At half-past 10 P. M. the Chairman said: I find I have done injustice to Massachusetts. I announced the majority at sixty thousand. The telegraph informs me that it will exceed seventy- five thousand. [Thr
Latest from the North--Lincoln calls for one Million of Atlanta reported burned and Sherman Marching on Charleston. Petersburg, November 13. -- of the 10th have been received. Lincoln's to conceded. Seymour is elected New York. Lincoln calls The Yankee papers Sherman, and his army &c. The Yankee papers of the probable capture of the November 7th. New Jersey, Kentucky and About 225,000 majority of the were cast for Lincoln and of Twelve Democrats and elected to Congress from New York.