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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 309 19 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 309 19 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 170 20 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 117 33 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 65 11 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 62 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 34 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 18, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Butler or search for Butler in all documents.

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up in fine style, and the booming of the guns was heard distinctly in our streets. There is a general impression, gathered chiefly from hints dropped by the Yankee press, that Grant is preparing for the final grand movement of the campaign in Virginia, which it is confidently hoped by the Yankee people is to end the war by taking Richmond. Constant and repeated failure seeming to have no effect upon him, we know of no reason why he should not make another attempt to dislodge our army. As Butler's canal is not yet finished, an attack on our centre is hardly to be thought of, and his next attack will probably be, to some extent, a repetition of his last, except it will, we think, be the last reversed; that is, he will assault with his heaviest columns on the north side. His experience on the south side should satisfy him there is nothing to be hoped from an advance in that quarter. He may argue that, if he could throw two corps on the Williamsburg and Nine-Mile roads at the points