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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 95 15 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 68 18 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 58 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 41 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 26 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 22 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 7 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 11 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 22, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Rousseau or search for Rousseau in all documents.

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s state that their iron-clads are about to move up the river to prevent our troops evacuating the place, if they are so disposed. This is easier said than done. Our forts and torpedoes will bring them to a stand still before they reach the city. Several days since, a raiding party came up from Pensacola and cut the Mobile and Great Northern railroad at Pollard's, seventy-two-miles northeast of Mobile, and then retired. From General Hood. We are still without advices from Hood, except through the Northern papers; full extracts from which will be found in another column. If half they tell be true, Hood is in a bad fix, indeed., Perhaps the worst piece of their news is the reported death of General Forrest. This being on the authority of Rousseau, there is much reason to hope it is untrue. Official information has been received here that a column of five thousand of the enemy are on the Mobile and Ohio railroad, north of its crossing of the Mississippi railroad.