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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 69 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 59 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 54 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 21 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 2 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 19 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 18 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 18 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 8, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Rienzi (Mississippi, United States) or search for Rienzi (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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d. "General Beauregard reached this place three days ago. His stay will probably be short. His presence here is not to take command of the army, but to look after its interests. I learned from Major Willis (of his staff) that he designs issuing an order to deprive all commands of their colors who fail to do their part in battle, and not return their flags until they retrieve their lost reputation. Arrangements are being made to furnish the destitute families about Corinth, Boonville, Rienzi, and other places in East Mississippi, with corn, as many of them are very destitute. Many depredations upon private property have been committed by the soldiers. The citizens had but little subsistence before our army reached the country; hundreds have been stripped of almost everything to eat. "General Hood speaks of issuing an order to have soldiers shot immediately who are found killing hogs and cattle. It is high time that indiscriminate robbery of the citizens was checked — it