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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Cockrell or search for Cockrell in all documents.

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withdrew the whole of the Third division and sent it around upon the other road, where he had arranged to have General Ames's division of the Twenty-fourth corps meet them and march together, to come in upon the north side of the fort, the only place at which the enemy could escape. General Cox had provided himself in advance with competent guides to conduct his column by the intricate roads leading through this part of the country; and by the middle of the afternoon he was in motion, with Cockrell's battery of Rodman's guns. --He had, as yet, made no use whatever of this battery, and the enemy had no reason to suppose that there was any artillery with the column. During the heat of the engagement, the band of the One Hundred and Fourth Ohio kept up a constant serenade of patriotic music. The rebels, determined not to be out-done, also posted a brass band upon the parapet of their work, which discoursed opposition melody. Among the more conspicuous tunes was recognized a favorite S