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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 66 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 48 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 42 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 30 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 16 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Bayard Taylor or search for Bayard Taylor in all documents.

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An English literary Woman. In his new novel of "John Godfrey," Bayard Taylor gives a sketch of certain literary ladies of New York; and in his novel "Broken in Harness," Edmond Yates give this description of one of the same class in England: "Mrs. Harding was a very fair average kind of woman. A dowdy little person, Mrs. Harding; the daughter of a snuffy Welsh rector, who had written a treatise on 'Aorists, ' and with whom Harding had read one long vacation — a round-faced, old-modish little woman, classically brought up, who could construe Cicero fluently, and looked upon Horace (Q. Flaccus, I mean,) as rather a loose personage — In the solitude of Plasy- dwdllem, George Harding was thrown into the sectary of this young female.--He did not fall in love with her — they were neither of them capable of anything violent of that nature; but — I am reduced to the phraseology of the servants' hall to express my meaning — they 'kept company' together; and when George took his