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The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1865., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President, appointing a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, with thanksgiving. (search)
g that the fortifications which have enabled it to hold out so long were originally constructed by the United States Government. If that were true, it does not much help the matter, for the strongest of those fortifications (Fort Sumter) was taken by General Beauregard in a few hours, whereas the United States required four years to retake it; and could not have taken it then, and never could have taken it, but for the evacuation of the city, in consequence of the unobstructed march of General Sherman through Georgia. And, after all, the Yankees taking Charleston, or taking Savannah, or taking any other city or section of the Southern Confederacy, is only doing, with a great amount of fuss and bloodshed, what they had done quietly and more effectually before the war by the peaceful methods of trade and commerce. Not only Charleston, but the whole South, was taken a good many years ago, and to some purpose, when tariffs, coasting laws and bounties rendered every slaveholding Sta
The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1865., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President, appointing a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, with thanksgiving. (search)
The news. The Richmond and Petersburg lines. The mud keeps everything at a standstill in the armies before Richmond and Petersburg. Grant still holds a heavy force at Hatcher's run, ready to launch in the direction of the Southside road on the return of the first dry weather. The enemy reported at Staunton. We stated on yesterday that the enemy, in heavy force, believed to be mostly cavalry, were advancing up the Valley towards Staunton. As yet we have received no official information on the subject of their advance. From the South. We hear nothing from Sherman, Schofield or Schimmelfenning. It is believed that bottomless and impassable mud surrounds them all. General Singleton and Judge Hughes. General Singleton and Judge Hughes, the Yankee commercial agents, and not peace commissioners, have arrived in the city, and are stopping at the Spotswood Hotel.
The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1865., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President, appointing a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, with thanksgiving. (search)
dispatches, that the rebel General Lee has gone southward to conduct the operations of opposing Sherman, leaving General Joe Johnston in command at Richmond and Petersburg; and we have additional par, and a considerable number of rebel troops are believed to have been dispatched to act against Sherman. The reports of Lee's designs to shortly abandon Petersburg and Richmond are repeated, and desdevastated herds and pastures, says another; he will elude Grant and fall like a thunderbolt on Sherman, says a third. It is possible that he may yet be able to concentrate one hundred thousand men, in a private letter to Mr. Washburn, of the House of Representatives, speaks very hopefully of Sherman's movements, and expresses the opinion that a few more days of successful operations will put t George Bancroft in New York. General D. C. Buell has written and published a reply to General Sherman's defence of General Grant. In the course of the Senate's debate of Saturday evening o