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The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1865., [Electronic resource], President's message.--General Grant's report. (search)
this Bureau. This belief is seriously interfering with the willingness of the freedmen to make contracts for the coming year. In some form, the Freedmen's Bureau is an absolute necessity until civil law is established and enforced, securing to the freedmen their rights and full protection. At present, however, it is independent of the military establishment of the country, and seems to be operated by the different agents of the Bureau according to their individual notions. Everywhere General Howard, the able head of the Bureau, made friends by the just and fair instructions and advice he gave; but the complaint in South Carolina was, that when he left, things went on as before. Many, perhaps the majority of the agents of the Freedmen's Bureau, advise the freedmen that by their own industry they must expect to live. To this end they endeavor to secure employment for them, and to see that both contracting parties comply with their engagements. In some instances, I am sorry to say,
The report of General Howard. Washington, December 20. --General Howard, Superintendent of Freedmen's Affairs, in an elaborate report, makes many recommendations. He says that wherever the planters have taken advantage of the aid offered by the Bureau, the pest results have followed that the Bureau, in conjunction with the military force, is at present a means of encouraging immigration to the different Southern States; and that, as nearly $12,000,000 will be required for the expenditGeneral Howard, Superintendent of Freedmen's Affairs, in an elaborate report, makes many recommendations. He says that wherever the planters have taken advantage of the aid offered by the Bureau, the pest results have followed that the Bureau, in conjunction with the military force, is at present a means of encouraging immigration to the different Southern States; and that, as nearly $12,000,000 will be required for the expenditures of the Bureau for the next year, he does not feel that the difficult problem given him has been solved, nor does he hope for complete and satisfactory results in the work of the Bureau yet. He firmly believes that the same just God that conducted us to freedom will so continue to direct us that we shall be able to keep the pledge we have made, that freedom shall be a substantial reality.
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1865., [Electronic resource], President's message.--General Grant's report. (search)
. --The President's message and General Grant's report on the condition of affairs in the South are having a very marked effect in both Houses, though the radicals see nothing in it to change their views. Carl Schurz's report, sent yesterday to the Senate, is quite minute, and takes pretty strong ground against trusting the affected loyalty of the Southern people. He differs from General Grant in his rose-colored report, and is not so much in favor of immediate restoration as General Howard. The Clerk of the House of Representatives has received certificates of election of Southern members only from North Carolina, 7; Louisiana, 4; Mississippi, 2; Tennessee, 7; Virginia, 6, and Arkansas, 1. Some of these have been referred to the select committee. The committee of elections will not attempt to decide upon Mr. Harris's or any other case until after the holidays. The opinion of good lawyers in the House is, that the President's reprieve left Senator Harris crimina
North Carolina Lands are not likely to revert to the owners very soon. The following order has just been issued by General Howard: "Hereafter control over no property will be given up if such action is likely to result in suffering to refugees or freedmen, or to seriously inconvenience the operations of the Bureau. Such property will be retained until the necessity for its use has passed."