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Polybius, Histories 32 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 26 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 26 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 22 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 22 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 20 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 18 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 16 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 16 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aeschines, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Thebes (Greece) or search for Thebes (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 25 document sections:

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Aeschines, On the Embassy, section 141 (search)
Then the people of Orchomenus were in exceeding fear, and had begged for peace, on condition that their lives should be spared and they be allowed to go forth from Boeotia;Orchomenus was one of the towns referred to in Aeschin. 2.104. when the Theban ambassadors were standing by, and when it was plain that Philip was threatened with the hostility of the Thebans and Thessalians: then it was that the cause was lost not from any fault of mine, but thanks to your treachery, Demosthenes, and your hired service to Thebes. Of this I think I can furnish important confirmation from what has actually happened.
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 141 (search)
What brought you into Thebes was the crisis and fear and need of alliance, not Demosthenes.For in this whole affair Demosthenes is responsible to you for three most serious mistakes. The first was this: when Philip was nominally making war against you, but really was far more the enemy of Thebes, as the event itself has proved (why need I say more?), Demosthenes concealed these facts, which were so important, and pretending that the alliance was to be brought about, not through the crisis, but was the crisis and fear and need of alliance, not Demosthenes.For in this whole affair Demosthenes is responsible to you for three most serious mistakes. The first was this: when Philip was nominally making war against you, but really was far more the enemy of Thebes, as the event itself has proved (why need I say more?), Demosthenes concealed these facts, which were so important, and pretending that the alliance was to be brought about, not through the crisis, but through his own negot
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 142 (search)
e to give up all consideration of the terms of the alliance, and to count themselves fortunate if only it were made; and when he had gained this point he betrayed all Boeotia to the Thebans by writing in the decree, “If any city refuse to follow Thebes, the Athenians shall aid the Boeotians in Thebes,”The traditional policy of Athens had been to support the smaller Boeotian cities in their refusal to recognize Theban dominion over them. cheating with words and altering the facts, as he is wont he decree, “If any city refuse to follow Thebes, the Athenians shall aid the Boeotians in Thebes,”The traditional policy of Athens had been to support the smaller Boeotian cities in their refusal to recognize Theban dominion over them. cheating with words and altering the facts, as he is wont to do; as though, forsooth, when the Boeotians should be suffering in fact, they would be content with Demosthenes' fine phrases, rather than indignant at the outrageous way in which they had been
Aeschines, On the Embassy, section 143 (search)
To prove that I speak the truth, please call Mnason the Phocian and those who have come with him, and call the delegates chosen by the Boeotian exiles. Come up to the platform, Liparus and Pythion, and do me the same service for the saving of my life that I did for you.Plea of the Boeotians and PhociansWould it not, then, be monstrous treatment for me if I should be convicted when my accuser is Demosthenes, the paid servant of Thebes and the wickedest man in Hellas, while my advocates are Phocians and Boeotians?
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 143 (search)
and, secondly, he laid two thirds of the costs of the war upon you, whose danger was more remote, and only one third on the Thebans (in all this acting for bribes); and the leadership by sea he caused to be shared equally by both; but all the expenditure he laid upon you and the leadership by land, if we are not to talk nonsense, he carried away bodily and handed it over to Thebes. The result was that in all the war that followed, Stratocles, your general, had no authority to plan for the safety of his tro
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 145 (search)
But he was guilty of a second and far greater crime; for he stole the senate-house of the city and the democracy outright and carried them off to Thebes, to the Cadmeia, by his agreement with the Boeotarchs for joint control. And he contrived such domination for himself that now he came forward to the platform and declared that he was going as ambassador wherever he chose, whether you sent him or not;
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 148 (search)
But the third and greatest of the crimes that I have mentioned is that which I am about to describe. Philip did not despise the Greeks, and he was well aware (for he was not without understanding) that he was about to contend in a little fraction of a day for all that he possessed; for that reason he wished to make peace, and was on the point of sending envoys. The officials at Thebes also were frightened at the impending danger—naturally, for they had no run-away orator and deserter to advise them, but the ten years' Phocian war had taught them a lesson not to be forg
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 150 (search)
(whose statue, it seems, Pheidias wrought expressly that Demosthenes might have it to perjure himself by and to make profit of) that if any one should say that we ought to make peace with Philip, he would seize him by the hair and drag him to prison—in this imitating the politics of Cleophon, who, they tell us, in the time of the war against the Lacedaemonians, brought ruin to the state. But when the officials in Thebes would pay no attention to him, but even turned your soldiers back again when they had marched out, for they wished to give you an opportunity to deliberate concerning
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 151 (search)
n indeed he became frantic, and went forward to the platform and stigmatized the Boeotarchs as traitors to Hellas, and declared that he would move a decree—he, who never looked on the face of an enemy in arms !—that you should send ambassadors to Thebes to ask them to give you free passage through their country for the march against Philip. But the officials in Thebes, ashamed lest they should seem in reality to be traitors to Hellas, turned from the thought of peace, and threw themselves into he became frantic, and went forward to the platform and stigmatized the Boeotarchs as traitors to Hellas, and declared that he would move a decree—he, who never looked on the face of an enemy in arms !—that you should send ambassadors to Thebes to ask them to give you free passage through their country for the march against Philip. But the officials in Thebes, ashamed lest they should seem in reality to be traitors to Hellas, turned from the thought of peace, and threw themselves into
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 161 (search)
nder was at first bitterly angry—naturallyPhilip's death was immediately followed by revolutionary movements centering in Thebes and Athens. The reference here is to Alexander's sudden descent upon Thebes, with the Thessalians as his supporters.—andThebes, with the Thessalians as his supporters.—and when the army was near Thebes, Demosthenes, who had been elected ambassador by you, turned back when halfway across Cithaeron and came running home—useless in peace and war alike! And worst of all: while you did not surrender himAfter the destructiThebes, Demosthenes, who had been elected ambassador by you, turned back when halfway across Cithaeron and came running home—useless in peace and war alike! And worst of all: while you did not surrender himAfter the destruction of Thebes and the suppression of the revolt elsewhere, Alexander demanded the surrender of Demosthenes and other anti-Macedonian Athenian statesmen. nor allow him to be brought to trial in the synod of the Greeks, he has betrayed you now, if curreThebes and the suppression of the revolt elsewhere, Alexander demanded the surrender of Demosthenes and other anti-Macedonian Athenian statesmen. nor allow him to be brought to trial in the synod of the Greeks, he has betrayed you now, if current repor
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