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Kenyon (United Kingdom) (search for this): speech 1, section 103
izelus, the father of the defendant Timarchus, died also. In the first years thereafter, so long as the defendant was a child, Arignotus received from the guardiansThe same men would act as administrators of the undivided estate and as guardians of the boy during his minority. all that one could ask. But after Timarchus was enrolled in the citizens' list, and had come into control of the estate, he thrust aside this old and unfortunate man, his own uncle, and made way with the estate. He gave nothing to Arignotus for his support, but was content to see him, fallen from such wealth, now receiving the alms that the city gives to disabled paupers.“The Senate also examines the infirm paupers. For there is a law that provides that persons who have property of less than three minas and are so infirm of body as to be unable to do any work, are to be examined by the Senate, and to receive from the state two obols each per day for their support.”—Aristot. Const. Ath. 49. (Kenyon's