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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Delphi (Greece) or search for Delphi (Greece) in all documents.

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Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
Troy the Greeks hung a leopard's skin in front of Antenor's house in token that it was to be respected by the soldiery. See Strab. 13.1.53. In Polygnotus's great picture of the sack of Troy, which was one of the sights of Delphi, the painter depicted the house of Antenor with the leopard's skin hung on the wall; in front of it were to be seen Antenor and his wife, with their children, including Glaucus, while beside them servants were lading an as of Athena, at which she had taken refuge, Ajax drew down the image itself. This incident was carved on the chest of Cypselus at Olympia (Paus. 5.19.5), and painted by Polygnotus in his great picture of the sack of Troy at Delphi (Paus. 10.26.3). The Scholiast on Hom. Il. xiii.66 and Quintus Smyrnaeus describe how the image of Athena turned up its eyes to the roof in horror at the violence offered to the suppliant. And having slain
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
ngs. See Preller-Robert, Griechische Mythologie, i.67ff. Compare M. Mayer, Die Giganten und Titanen, (Berlin, 1887). The battle of the gods and the giants was sculptured on the outside of the temple of Apollo at Delphi, as we learn from the description of Euripides (Eur. Ion 208ff.). On similar stories see Frazer's Appendix to Apollodorus, “War of Earth on Heaven.” These were matchless in the bulk of their bodies and invincible i Gigant. 87ff., he was slain by Ares. Enceladus fled, but Athena threw on him in his flight the island of SicilyCompare Verg. A. 3.578ff. The combat of Athena with Enceladus was sculptured on the temple of Apollo at Delphi. See Eur. Ion 209ff.; and she flayed Pallas and used his skin to shield her own body in the fight.According to one account the Pallas whom Athena flayed, and whose skin she used as a covering, was her own father, who had attem
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
p with Eurytus, he went to Amyclae and was purified by Deiphobus, son of Hippolytus.Compare Diod. 4.31.4ff.; Scholiast on Hom. Il. v.392. But being afflicted with a dire disease on account of the murder of Iphitus he went to Delphi and inquired how he might be rid of the disease. As the Pythian priestess answered him not by oracles, he was fain to plunder the temple, and, carrying off the tripod, to institute an oracle of his own. But Apollo fought him,As to t 9.29(43); Cicero, De natura deorum iii.16.42; Hyginus, Fab. 32; Serv. Verg. A. 8.300. The subject was often represented in ancient art; for example, it was sculptured in the gable of the Treasury of the Siphnians at Delphi; the principal pieces of the sculpture were discovered by the French in their excavation of the sanctuary. See E. Bourguet, Les ruines de Delphes (Paris, 1914), pp. 76ff., and Frazer, commentary on Pausanias, vol. v.
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
oclus, son of Iphis,The place of Eteocles among the Seven Champions is recognized by Aesch. Seven 458ff., Soph. OC 1316, and Euripides in one play (Eur. Supp. 871ff.), but not in another (Eur. Ph. 1090ff.); and he is omitted by Hyginus, Fab. 70. His right to rank among the Seven seems to have been acknowledged by the Argives themselves, since they included his portrait in a group of statuary representing the Champions which they dedicated at Delphi. See Paus. 10.10.3. and MecisteusBrother of Adrastus. See Apollod. 1.9.13. in the list of the seven. Having come to Nemea, of which Lycurgus was king, they sought for water; and Hypsipyle showed them the way to a spring, leaving behind an infant boy Opheltes, whom she nursed, a child of Eurydice and Lycurgus.As to the meeting of the Seven Champions with Hypsipyle at Nemea, the death of Opheltes, and the institution of the Nemean games, see Schol
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
of the underworld, which Polygnotus painted at Delphi, the artist depicted Ajax as a castaway, the is revenge by murdering Neoptolemus at Delphi. This version of the legend is followe that reason he was slain by Orestes at Delphi. But some say that he went to Delphi toDelphi to demand satisfaction from Apollo for the death of his father, and that he rifled the votive oereus the Phocian.The murder of Neoptolemus at Delphi, as Apollodorus observes, was variously relateione, daughter of Menelaus, he went to Delphi to inquire about offspring; for he had Pausanias, for he mentions the hearth at Delphi on which the priest of Apollo slew Neoptolemus2). The story that Neoptolemus came to Delphi to plunder the sanctuary, which is noted in Cyprus. Podalirius went to Delphi and inquired of the oracle where he shoen Orestes was grown up, he repaired to Delphi and asked the god whether he should tak[4 more...]
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
8.4.9, Paus. 8.47.4), and was the theme of tragedies by Sophocles and Euripides. See TGF (Nauck 2nd ed.), pp. 146ff., 436ff.; The Fragments of Sophocles. ed. A. C. Pearson, i. 46ff., ii.70ff. Different versions of the story were current among ancient writers and illustrated by ancient artists. See Frazer, note on Paus. 1.4.6 (vol. ii. pp. 75ff.). One of these versions, which I omitted to notice in that place, ran as follows. On a visit to Delphi, king Aleus of Tegea was warned by the oracle that his daughter would bear a son who would kill his maternal uncles, the sons of Aleus. To guard against this catastrophe, Aleus hurried home and appointed his daughter priestess of Athena, declaring that, should she prove unchaste, he would put her to death. As chance would have it, Herakles arrived at Tegea on his way to Elis, where he purposed to make war on Augeas. The king entertained him hospitably <
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
down the walls. But they sent a portion of the booty to Apollo at Delphi and with it Manto, daughter of Tiresias; for they had vowed his madness when he had brought the necklace and the robe to Delphi and dedicated them.According to Ephorus, or his son Demophilus, this oracle was really given to Alcmaeon at Delphi. See Athenaeus vi.22, p. 232 DF, where the words of the oracle are quo them Temenus and Axion. carrying the necklace and robe to Delphi to dedicate them, turned in at the house of Agapenor at the same ving acquainted their mother with these things, they went to Delphi and dedicated the necklace and robeAccording to Paus. us, not the sons of Alcmaeon, who dedicated the necklace at Delphi. The necklace, or what passed for it, was preserved at Delphi in thDelphi in the sanctuary of Forethought Athena as late as the Sacred War in the fourth century B.C., when it was carried off, with much more of
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
.118, p. 1796. According to Hyginus, Fab. 125, Ulysses had two sons, Nausithous and Telegonus, by Circe. As to Telegonus, see also below, Apollod. E.7.36ff. Having tarried a year there, he sailed the ocean, and offered sacrifices to the souls,The visit of Ulysses to the land of the dead is the theme of the eleventh book of the Odyssey. Compare Hyginus, Fab. 125. The visit was the subject of one of the two great pictures by Polygnotus at Delphi. See Paus. 10.28-31. and by Circe's advice consulted the soothsayer Tiresias,As to the consultation with Tiresias, see Hom. Od. 11.90-151. and beheld the souls both of heroes and of heroines. He also looked on his mother AnticliaAs to the interview of Ulysses with his mother, see Hom. Od. 11.153-224. and Elpenor, who had died of a fall in the house of Circe.In the hot air of Circe's enchanted isle Elpenor had slept for coolness on the roof of the
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
a staff of olive-wood. But Hyllus married Iole according to his father's commands, and sought to effect the return of the Heraclids. So he went to Delphi and inquired how they should return; and the god said that they should await the third crop before returning. But Hyllus supposed that the third cro son of Aristomachus and brother of Temenus and Cresphontes, the conquerors of the Peloponnese (Paus. 2.18.7). Some said he was shot by Apollo at Delphi for not consulting the oracle, but others said he was murdered by the children of Pylades and Electra (Paus. 3.1.6). Apollodorus clearly adopts the formerhe lot found a toad; those who got Lacedaemon found a serpent; and those who got Messene found a fox.In the famous paintings by Polygnotus at Delphi, the painter depicted Menelaus, king of Sparta, with the device of a serpent on his shield. See Paus. 10.26.3. The great Messenian hero A
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
that in later times a ram was commonly accepted as a substitute for the human victim. Compare The Dying God, pp. 161ff. And he married a second wife, Ino, by whom he had Learchus and Melicertes. But Ino plotted against the children of Nephele and persuaded the women to parch the wheat; and having got the wheat they did so without the knowledge of the men. But the earth, being sown with parched wheat, did not yield its annual crops; so Athamas sent to Delphi to inquire how he might be delivered from the dearth. Now Ino persuaded the messengers to say it was foretold that the infertility would cease if Phrixus were sacrificed to Zeus. When Athamas heard that, he was forced by the inhabitants of the land to bring Phrixus to the altar. But Nephele caught him and her daughter up and gave them a ram with a golden fleece, which she had received from Hermes, and borne through the sky by the ram they crossed land and s
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