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Polybius, Histories 32 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Antigone (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 26 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 26 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 22 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 22 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Thebes (Greece) or search for Thebes (Greece) in all documents.

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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
Having succeeded to the kingdom of Thebes, Creon cast out the Argive dead unburied, ison by her. In time the son grew up and came to Thebes, where Creon detected him by the bodily mark wnd Boeotia, on the direct road from Eleusis to Thebes (Eur. Supp. 756ff.; Plut. Thes. 29).d the Athenians marched with Theseus, captured Thebes, and gave the dead to their kinsfolk to bury. he was mounting a ladder at the siege of Thebes. See Apollod. 3.6.7. Hence his body wa the Epigoni, purposed to march against Thebes to avenge the death of their fathers;Ths also a cenotaph of the seer on the road from Thebes to Chalcis (Paus. 9.18.4). Diod. ; for they had vowed that, if they took Thebes, they would dedicate to him the fairestgon. i.308. After the capture of Thebes, when Alcmaeon learned that his mother below, Apollod. 3.12.6. Similarly the land of Thebes was supposed to be visited with barrenness of [3 more.
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
son of Pheres, from Pherae; Ancaeus and Cepheus, sons of Lycurgus, from Arcadia; Jason, son of Aeson, from Iolcus; Iphicles, son of Amphitryon, from Thebes; Pirithous, son of Ixion, from Larissa; Peleus, son of Aeacus, from Phthia; Telamon, son of Aeacus, from Salamis; Eurytion, son of Actor, froBeing arraigned by Agrius, he fled to Argos and came to Adrastus, whose daughter Deipyle he married and begat Diomedes. Tydeus marched against Thebes with Adrastus,See below, Apollod. 3.6.3ff. and died of a wound which he received at the hand of Melanippus. But the sons of Agrius, to wit,h of Telephus in Arcadia, and killed him. But Diomedes conveyed the corpse to Argos and buried him in the place where now a city is called Oenoe after him.Compare Paus. 2.25.2. And having married Aegialia, daughter of Adrastus or, as some say, of Aegialeus, he went to the wars against Thebes and Troy.
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
eir late owners. See notes on Apollod. 2.5.11 (Antaeus), Apollod. 2.7.7 (Cycnus). Compare Apollod. E.2.5 (Oenomaus); note on Apollod. 1.7.8 (Evenus). After Eurystheus had perished, the Heraclids came to attack Peloponnese and they captured all the cities.For the first attempted invasion of the Peloponnese by the Heraclids or sons of Herakles, see Diod. 4.58.1-4. The invasion is commonly spoken of as a return, because, though their father Herakles had been born at Thebes in Boeotia, he regarded Mycenae and Tiryns, the kingdom of his forefathers, as his true home. The word (ka/qodos) here employed by Apollodorus is regularly applied by Greek writers to the return of exiles from banishment, and in particular to the return of the Heraclids. See, for example, Strab. 8.3.30, Strab. 8.4.1, Strab. 8.5.5, Strab. 8.6.10, Strab. 8.7.1, Strab. 8.8.5, Strab. 9.1.7, Strab. 10.2.6, Strab. 13.1.3, Strab. 14.2
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
Lysimache, daughter of Abas, son of Melampus, and had by her Adrastus, Parthenopaeus, Pronax, Mecisteus, Aristomachus, and Eriphyle, whom Amphiaraus married. Parthenopaeus had a son Promachus, who marched with the Epigoni against Thebes;Compare below, Apollod. 3.7.2. and Mecisteus had a son Euryalus, who went to Troy.See Hom. Il. 2.565ff. Pronax had a son Lycurgus; and Adrastus had by Amphithea, daughter of Pronax, three daughters, Argia, Deipyle, and , a gift of Hephaestus; they had brazen feet and puffed fire from their mouths. These creatures Aeetes ordered him to yoke and to sow dragon's teeth; for he had got from Athena half of the dragon's teeth which Cadmus sowed in Thebes.Compare Ap. Rhod., Argon. iii.401ff., 1176ff. While Jason puzzled how he could yoke the bulls, Medea conceived a passion for him; now she was a witch, daughter of Aeetes and Idyia, daughter of Ocean. And fearing lest he mig
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
ion had similarly misbehaved with a leopardess is not mentioned by the natural historian. But Hesiod and some others have said that Atalanta was not a daughter of Iasus, but of Schoeneus; and Euripides says that she was a daughter of Maenalus, and that her husband was not Melanion but Hippomenes.See above, note on p. 399. It may have been in his lost tragedy, Meleager, that Euripides named the father and husband of Atalanta. She is named in one of the existing fragments (No. 530) of the play. See TGF (Nauck 2nd ed.), pp. 525ff. And by Melanion, or Ares, Atalanta had a son Parthenopaeus, who went to the war against Thebes.See above, Apollod. 3.6.3. According to others, the father of Parthenopaeus was neither Melanion nor Ares, but Meleager. See Hyginus, Fab. 70, 99, and 270; Scriptores rerum mythicarum Latini, ed. Bode, i. pp. 54, 125 (First Vatican Mythographer 174; Second Vatican Mythographer 144).
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