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treating fire on the one hand by itself, and the elements opposed to it—earth, air and water—on the other, as a single nature.Cf. 3.14. This can be seen from a study of his writings.e.g. Empedocles, Fr. 62 (Diels).Such, then, as I say, is his account of the nature and number of the first principles.Leucippus,Of Miletus; fl. circa 440 (?) B.C. See Burnet, E.G.P. 171 ff. however, and his disciple DemocritusOf Abdera; fl. circa 420 B.C. E.G.P loc. cit. hold that the elements are the Full and the Void—calling the one "what is" and the other "what is not." Of these they identify the full or solid with "what is," and the void or rare with "what is not" (hence they hold that what is not is no less real than what is,For the probable connection between the Atomists and the Eleatics see E.G.P. 173, 175, and cf. De Gen. et Corr. 324b 35-325a 32. because Void is as real as Body); and they say that t<
treating fire on the one hand by itself, and the elements opposed to it—earth, air and water—on the other, as a single nature.Cf. 3.14. This can be seen from a study of his writings.e.g. Empedocles, Fr. 62 (Diels).Such, then, as I say, is his account of the nature and number of the first principles.Leucippus,Of Miletus; fl. circa 440 (?) B.C. See Burnet, E.G.P. 171 ff. however, and his disciple DemocritusOf Abdera; fl. circa 420 B.C. E.G.P loc. cit. hold that the elements are the Full and the Void—calling the one "what is" and the other "what is not." Of these they identify the full or solid with "what is," and the void or rare with "what is not" (hence they hold that what is not is no less real than what is,For the probable connection between the Atomists and the Eleatics see E.G.P. 173, 175, and cf. De Gen. et Corr. 324b 35-325a 32. because Void is as real as Body); and they say that th<
arises in things,they casually ignored this point, very much as the other thinkers did. Such, then, as I say, seems to be the extent of the inquiries which the earlier thinkers made into these two kinds of cause.At the same time, however, and even earlier the so-calledAristotle seems to have regarded Pythagoras as a legendary person. Pythagoreans applied themselves to mathematics, and were the first to develop this sciencePythagoras himself (fl. 532 B.C.) is said by Aristoxenus (ap. Stobaeus 1.20.1) to have been the first to make a theoretical study of arithmetic.; and through studying it they came to believe that its principles are the principles of everything.And since numbers are by nature first among these principles, and they fancied that they could detect in numbers, to a greater extent than in fire and earth and water, many analoguesCf. Aristot. Met. 14.6ff.. of what is and comes into bei
treating fire on the one hand by itself, and the elements opposed to it—earth, air and water—on the other, as a single nature.Cf. 3.14. This can be seen from a study of his writings.e.g. Empedocles, Fr. 62 (Diels).Such, then, as I say, is his account of the nature and number of the first principles.Leucippus,Of Miletus; fl. circa 440 (?) B.C. See Burnet, E.G.P. 171 ff. however, and his disciple DemocritusOf Abdera; fl. circa 420 B.C. E.G.P loc. cit. hold that the elements are the Full and the Void—calling the one "what is" and the other "what is not." Of these they identify the full or solid with "what is," and the void or rare with "what is not" (hence they hold that what is not is no less real than what is,For the probable connection between the Atomists and the Eleatics see E.G.P. 173, 175, and cf. De Gen. et Corr. 324b 35-325a 32. because Void is as real as Body); and they say that t<