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325/4 B.C.In the archonship of Anticles at Athens, the Romans installed as consuls Lucius Cornelius and Quintus Popillius.Anticles was archon at Athens from July 325 to June 324 B.C. L. Cornelius Lentulus and Q. Publilius Philo were consuls in 327 B.C. (Broughton, 1.145). In his narrative, Diodorus has reached, actually, the late summer of 324 B.C. The narrative of Curtius is lost down to the story of Alexander's death. In this year Alexander secured replacements fr324 B.C. The narrative of Curtius is lost down to the story of Alexander's death. In this year Alexander secured replacements from the Persians equal to the number of these soldiers whom he had released, and assigned a thousand of them to the bodyguardsArrian. 7.6.3 states that these thousand formed a fifth squadron of the Companion Cavalry. stationed at the court. In all respects he showed the same confidence in them as in the Macedonians. At this time Peucestes arrived with twenty thousand Persian bowmen and slingers. Alexander placed these in units with his other soldiers, and by the
Since there were by now sons of the Macedonians born of captive women, he determined the exact number of these. There were about ten thousand, and he set aside for them revenues sufficient to provide them with an upbringing proper for freeborn children, and set over them teachers to give them their proper training.Plut. Alexander 71.5; Arrian 7.12 (stating that these were the children of the veterans who returned to Macedonia); Justin 12.4.6 (under 330 B.C.).After this he marched with his army from Susa, crossed the Tigris, and encamped in the villages called Carae. Thence for four days he marched through Sittacene and came to the place called Sambana.Diodorus's topography is confused. His tradition (shared by Curtius) does not place the mutiny at Opis, as does Arrian; hence Alexander is still at Susa. The "Carian" villages were in Babylonia (Book 19.12.1) and so on the right bank of the Tigris; Sittacene w
325/4 B.C.In the archonship of Anticles at Athens, the Romans installed as consuls Lucius Cornelius and Quintus Popillius.Anticles was archon at Athens from July 325 to June 324 B.C. L. Cornelius Lentulus and Q. Publilius Philo were consuls in 327 B.C. (Broughton, 1.145). In his narrative, Diodorus has reached, actually, the late summer of 324 B.C. The narrative of Curtius is lost down to the story of Alexander's death. In this year Alexander secured replacements from the Persians equal to the number of these soldiers whom he had released, and assigned a thousand of them to the bodyguardsArrian. 7.6.3 states that these thousand formed a fifth squadron of the Companion Cavalry. stationed at the court. In all respects he showed the same confidence in them as in the Macedonians. At this time Peucestes arrived with twenty thousand Persian bowmen and slingers. Alexander placed these in units with his other soldiers, and by the
e natives in the one language, while in the other they preserve most of the Greek vocabulary, and they maintain some Greek practices.These are probably the Eretrians whom Herodotus mentions (Hdt. 6.119) as having been carried off by Xerxes, although he places them nearer to Susa. The place is mentioned again, Book 19.19.2. In their tenacious Hellenism, they anticipated the settlers of the Hellenistic period (cp. F. Grosso, Rivista di Filologia Classica, 36 (1958), 350-375).After a stay of some days he resumed his march at length and diverging from the main roadThe age-old road from Baghdad to Hamadan, the main route from Mesopotamia to Iran. for the purpose of sight-seeing he entered the region called Bagistane, a magnificent country covered with fruit trees and rich in everything which makes for good living. Next he came to a land which could support enormous herds of horses, where of old they say that there were
325/4 B.C.In the archonship of Anticles at Athens, the Romans installed as consuls Lucius Cornelius and Quintus Popillius.Anticles was archon at Athens from July 325 to June 324 B.C. L. Cornelius Lentulus and Q. Publilius Philo were consuls in 327 B.C. (Broughton, 1.145). In his narrative, Diodorus has reached, actually, the late summer of 324 B.C. The narrative of Curtius is lost down to the story of Alexander's death. In this year Alexander secured replacements from the Persians equal to the number of these soldiers whom he had released, and assigned a thousand of them to the bodyguardsArrian. 7.6.3 states that these thousand formed a fifth squadron of the Companion Cavalry. stationed at the court. In all respects he showed the same confidence in them as in the Macedonians. At this time Peucestes arrived with twenty thousand Persian bowmen and slingers. Alexander placed these in units with his other soldiers, and by the