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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge). Search the whole document.

Found 6 total hits in 2 results.

Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 625
ndeed, and I join in the same prayer; for when there are two, it is not possible for one to be unhappy and the other not. Helen My dear friends, I no longer sigh or grieve over what is past. I have my husband, for whom I have been waiting to come from Troy for many years. Menelaos You have me, and I have you; although it was hard to live through so many days, I now understand the actions of the goddess. My joy is tearful; it has more delight than sorrow. Helen What can I say? What mortal could ever have hoped for this? I hold you to my heart, little as I ever thought to. Menelaos And I hold you, whom we thought to have gone to Ida's city and the unhappy towers of Ilion. By the gods, how were you taken from my home? Helen Ah! ah! You are setting out on a bitter beginning. Ah! ah! You are asking about a bitter tale. Menelaos Speak; all gifts from the gods should be heard. Helen I detest the story I am now about to tell. Menelaos Tell it anyway. It is sweet to hear of troubles.
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 625
ut the god who took you from my home is driving us on to another fortune, better than this. An evil that was good brought you together with me, your husband after a long time, but may I still benefit by my good luck. Chorus May you benefit indeed, and I join in the same prayer; for when there are two, it is not possible for one to be unhappy and the other not. Helen My dear friends, I no longer sigh or grieve over what is past. I have my husband, for whom I have been waiting to come from Troy for many years. Menelaos You have me, and I have you; although it was hard to live through so many days, I now understand the actions of the goddess. My joy is tearful; it has more delight than sorrow. Helen What can I say? What mortal could ever have hoped for this? I hold you to my heart, little as I ever thought to. Menelaos And I hold you, whom we thought to have gone to Ida's city and the unhappy towers of Ilion. By the gods, how were you taken from my home? Helen Ah! ah! You are sett