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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs).

Found 223 total hits in 55 results.

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Argos (Greece) (search for this): card 232
ndeserved misfortune. Demophon Raising Iolaus to his feet Three paths of concern compel me, Iolaus, not to reject your words. Most important is Zeus, at whose altar you sit with this assembly of fledglings; second, kinship and the debt long-standing that these children should for their father's sake be well treated at our hands; and last, fear of disgrace, the thing I must be most concerned about. For if I am to allow this altar to be robbed by a foreigner, it will be thought that it is no free land I govern but that I have betrayed suppliants for fear of the Argives. And that is nearly enough to make me hang myself. But while I could wish that you had come in happier plight, still even so have no fear that anyone shall drag you and the children by force from the altar. To the Herald As for you, go to Argos and report this to Eurystheus, and say in addition that if he makes any charge against these foreigners, he shall receive his due. But you shall never take these children away.
Argos (Greece) (search for this): card 181
ak in reply, and no one shall thrust me away before I am done, as they have elsewhere. We have nothing to do with this man. For since we no longer have a share in Argos and this has been voted, but are in exile from our native land, how can this man rightfully take us off as Mycenaeans, when they have banished us from the country? We are now foreigners. Or do you think it right that whoever is banished from Argos should be banished from the whole Greek world? Not from Athens, at any rate: they shall not drive Heracles' children out of their land from fear of the Argives! This is not Trachis or some Achaean town, places from which you expelled these children, suppliants though they were and seated at the altar. You did not do this by any lawful plea but by prating of Argos' importance, just as you are doing today. If that happens here and they judge your case the winner, Athens in my judgment is no longer free. But I know the nature and temper of these men. They will be willing to
Athens (Greece) (search for this): card 181
land, how can this man rightfully take us off as Mycenaeans, when they have banished us from the country? We are now foreigners. Or do you think it right that whoever is banished from Argos should be banished from the whole Greek world? Not from Athens, at any rate: they shall not drive Heracles' children out of their land from fear of the Argives! This is not Trachis or some Achaean town, places from which you expelled these children, suppliants though they were and seated at the altar. You did not do this by any lawful plea but by prating of Argos' importance, just as you are doing today. If that happens here and they judge your case the winner, Athens in my judgment is no longer free. But I know the nature and temper of these men. They will be willing to die. For in the eyes of good men a sense of honor is more precious than life. I have said enough to the city: excessive praise is hateful, and I myself know that I have been displeased at being overpraised. But I want to say to
othing to do with this man. For since we no longer have a share in Argos and this has been voted, but are in exile from our native land, how can this man rightfully take us off as Mycenaeans, when they have banished us from the country? We are now foreigners. Or do you think it right that whoever is banished from Argos should be banished from the whole Greek world? Not from Athens, at any rate: they shall not drive Heracles' children out of their land from fear of the Argives! This is not Trachis or some Achaean town, places from which you expelled these children, suppliants though they were and seated at the altar. You did not do this by any lawful plea but by prating of Argos' importance, just as you are doing today. If that happens here and they judge your case the winner, Athens in my judgment is no longer free. But I know the nature and temper of these men. They will be willing to die. For in the eyes of good men a sense of honor is more precious than life. I have said enough
Greece (Greece) (search for this): card 181
blood. It is my claim that as right-hand man to Heracles I once sailed with Theseus to fetch the girdle, cause of many deaths, The sense of the supplement is less clear even than usual. Hyginus 30 makes Heracles give Antiope, Hippolyta's daughter, to Theseus, and in Pindar, fr. 176 Sn, she is the mother of Demophon. But other supplements are also possible. and brought your father out of the dark recesses of Hades. All Hellas bears witness to this. For these things his children here ask repayment [, not to be surrendered, not to be dragged off against the will of your gods and banished from the land. For this is a particular shame to you, and an evil in the eyes of the city, for suppliants, wanderers, kinsmen—alas for the pain, look at them, look at them—to be dragged off by force]. Kneeling before Demophon as a suppliant But I beg you and wreathe you in my suppliant grasp, do not—I entreat you by your chin—do
Argive (Greece) (search for this): card 134
Herald I am an Argive, for that is what you ask me. But I want to tell you my purpose in coming and who it is that has sent me. Eurystheus, king of Mycenae, has sent me here to fetch these children. I have come here, stranger, with many just pleas both to carry out and to urge. I am an Argive myself, and I seek to take away these Argives who have run away from my own country, persons sentenced by the laws of that country to die. It is proper that we who are the city's inhabitants should passArgive myself, and I seek to take away these Argives who have run away from my own country, persons sentenced by the laws of that country to die. It is proper that we who are the city's inhabitants should pass binding sentences against our own number. We have come to the hearths of many others and have taken our stand on these same principles, and no one has had the hardihood to increase his own troubles. But they have come here either because they espy some folly in you or because out of desperation they are risking their all to see whether will or will not prove to be < such a mad and brainless fool>. For they surely do not expect that while you are in your right mind, you alone of all the
Argos (Greece) (search for this): card 134
their misfortunes. Come, make the comparison: what is your profit if you let these men into your country, and what if you let us take them away? From us you stand to gain things such as this: winning for your city an army as powerful as that of Argos and the whole might of Eurystheus. But if you give ear to the pleas and the lamentations of these and grow soft, then the matter becomes one for spears to settle: for you must not suppose that we will let the contest go with no play of cold steel. What then will you say? Of what lands will you allege you have been robbed, of what booty despoiled, that you go to war with Argos? In defense of what allies, on whose behalf will you bury the fallen? Your citizens will have nothing good to say of you if for an old man's sake, a a nullity as good as dead, and for these children you put your foot in the mire: if you let go of your true advantage, you will find only hope, and that is a thing that falls far short of cash in hand. Against the
Mycenae (Greece) (search for this): card 134
Herald I am an Argive, for that is what you ask me. But I want to tell you my purpose in coming and who it is that has sent me. Eurystheus, king of Mycenae, has sent me here to fetch these children. I have come here, stranger, with many just pleas both to carry out and to urge. I am an Argive myself, and I seek to take away these Argives who have run away from my own country, persons sentenced by the laws of that country to die. It is proper that we who are the city's inhabitants should pasmanhood, would be but poor fighters, if it is this prospect that raises your spirits, and there is a long stretch of time before then, when they might well be killed. But take my advice: give me nothing but merely allow me to take what is mine and thereby win Mycenae for an ally. Do not make the mistake you Athenians so often make, taking the weak for your friends when you might have chosen the strong. Chorus Who can decide a plea or judge a speech until he has heard plainly from both sides?
Argos (Greece) (search for this): card 95
Chorus What is your errand? To win the right to address the city? Iolaus We ask not to be surrendered, not to be dragged off against the will of your gods to Argos. Herald But this will not satisfy your owners. They have control of you and have found you here. Chorus It is right to respect the gods' suppliants, stranger. They should not be made to leave their sanctuaries with violence. For Lady Justice will not be so treated. Herald Then send these chattel of Eurystheus from your land and I shall not use force. Chorus It is godless to yield up a suppliant band of strangers. Herald Yes, but it is a fine thing to keep one's foot clear of trouble and to hit on the superior plan.
Euboea (Greece) (search for this): card 73
the feeble old man lying spread upon the ground! O unhappy man, at whose hands have you had this wretched fall? Iolaus This man, strangers, dishonors your gods and drags me by force from the altar steps. Chorus But you, old sir, from what land have you come to this people who dwell together in four cities?The Marathonian tetrapolis (Marathon, Oenoe, Probalinthus, and Tricorythus) was an old confederacy of towns that existed before the unification of Attica under Theseus. Have you left the shore of Euboea and put in from beyond the water with sea-going oar? Iolaus It is no islander's life that I live. We have come to your land from Mycenae. Chorus What is the name the people of Mycenae call you? Iolaus You know, I'm sure, of Iolaus, the man who stood at Heracles' side. I am not unknown to fame. Chorus I have heard of you before. But whose are the young children you lead by the hand? Tell us. Iolaus They are Heracles' sons, strangers, who have come as suppliants to you and your c
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