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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs).

Found 223 total hits in 55 results.

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Argos (Greece) (search for this): card 362
Chorus You came to another city, full equal of Argos, and foreigner that you were you tried to drag off by force wanderers, the god's suppliants and my country's petitioners, not yielding to the king or urging any plea of justice. How can such things be accounted fair in the court of men of sense?
Argive (Greece) (search for this): card 381
Enter by Eisodos B Demophon. Iolaus My son, why have you come with worry in your glance? Are you going to tell me something new about the enemy? Are they tarrying, or have they arrived, or what news have you heard? For you will assuredly not prove false what the herald said. The general, who has been fortunate before now, will come to Athens, I am sure, and in no humble mood. But of course Zeus is the punisher of thoughts that are too high and mighty. Demophon The Argive army has arrived and Eurystheus its leader. I have seen him myself: a man who claims to be well versed in the art of generalship must not observe the enemy by means of messengers. But he has not yet sent his army into the plain of Attica. Rather, sitting upon a rocky brow, he is deliberating (I will tell you my impressions) by what route he should bring so great an army within the borders of our land and safely encamp it. Where my own part is concerned, all is well prepared: the city is in arms, the sacrificial
Attica (Greece) (search for this): card 381
? For you will assuredly not prove false what the herald said. The general, who has been fortunate before now, will come to Athens, I am sure, and in no humble mood. But of course Zeus is the punisher of thoughts that are too high and mighty. Demophon The Argive army has arrived and Eurystheus its leader. I have seen him myself: a man who claims to be well versed in the art of generalship must not observe the enemy by means of messengers. But he has not yet sent his army into the plain of Attica. Rather, sitting upon a rocky brow, he is deliberating (I will tell you my impressions) by what route he should bring so great an army within the borders of our land and safely encamp it. Where my own part is concerned, all is well prepared: the city is in arms, the sacrificial victims stand in readiness for the gods to whom they are to be sacrificed, and offerings are being made throughout the city by diviners. But I gathered all the chanters of oracles into one place and closely examined
Athens (Greece) (search for this): card 381
Enter by Eisodos B Demophon. Iolaus My son, why have you come with worry in your glance? Are you going to tell me something new about the enemy? Are they tarrying, or have they arrived, or what news have you heard? For you will assuredly not prove false what the herald said. The general, who has been fortunate before now, will come to Athens, I am sure, and in no humble mood. But of course Zeus is the punisher of thoughts that are too high and mighty. Demophon The Argive army has arrived and Eurystheus its leader. I have seen him myself: a man who claims to be well versed in the art of generalship must not observe the enemy by means of messengers. But he has not yet sent his army into the plain of Attica. Rather, sitting upon a rocky brow, he is deliberating (I will tell you my impressions) by what route he should bring so great an army within the borders of our land and safely encamp it. Where my own part is concerned, all is well prepared: the city is in arms, the sacrificial
Argive (Greece) (search for this): card 474
ge to Demeter's daughter if we are to survive and this city likewise. This is our perplexity: the king says that he will not sacrifice either his own children or those of anyone else. And he tells me by hint and indirection that, unless we find a way out of our difficulties, we must find some other land, since he desires to save this country. Maiden Is it this prophecy that keeps us from being safe? Iolaus Yes, this prophecy. In all else our fortune is good. Maiden Then fear no more the Argive enemy's spear. For I am ready, old man, of my own accord and unbidden, to appear for sacrifice and be killed. For what shall we say if this city is willing to run great risks on our behalf, and yet we, who lay toil and struggle on others, run away from death when it lies in our power to save them? It must not be so, for it deserves nothing but mockery if we sit and groan as suppliants of the gods and yet, though we are descended from that great man who is our father, show ourselves to be c
Argos (Greece) (search for this): card 48
from the face of the earth. A curse on you, hateful creature, and on him who sent you for all the many troubles that same mouth of yours also laid on these children's noble father! Herald No doubt you imagine this is a fine position you have taken up and that you have come to a city that is your ally. What a fool you are! For there is no one who will choose to have your worthless might in preference to Eurystheus. March! Why take all this trouble? You must get up from the altar and on to Argos, where a stony justice awaits you. Iolaus No, since the god's altar will protect me, and since the land on which we stand is free. Herald Do you wish to cause this hand of mine more work? Iolaus Surely you will not use force to take me and these children away. Herald You'll see. You are not, it seems, a good prophet in this. Iolaus It shall not happen while I am still alive! Herald Off! Be gone! He pulls Iolaus away from the altar and knocks him onto the ground. And as for these, whet
Athens (Greece) (search for this): card 48
l you are! For there is no one who will choose to have your worthless might in preference to Eurystheus. March! Why take all this trouble? You must get up from the altar and on to Argos, where a stony justice awaits you. Iolaus No, since the god's altar will protect me, and since the land on which we stand is free. Herald Do you wish to cause this hand of mine more work? Iolaus Surely you will not use force to take me and these children away. Herald You'll see. You are not, it seems, a good prophet in this. Iolaus It shall not happen while I am still alive! Herald Off! Be gone! He pulls Iolaus away from the altar and knocks him onto the ground. And as for these, whether you like it or not I shall take them off, regarding them as the property of Eurystheus, as in fact they are. Iolaus Dwellers in Athens from of old, help us! We, who are suppliants of Zeus Agoraios, are being violently treated, our suppliant wreaths are defiled, a disgrace to the city and an insult to the gods.
Argos (Greece) (search for this): card 630
words of this man. For you have long been in anguish whether the men who have now arrived would ever return. Enter Alcmene from the temple. Alcmene Why, Iolaus, has this whole temple been filled with shouts? Has a herald come a second time from Argos to do you violence? My strength may be weak, stranger, but you must realize this: you cannot remove these children while I still live. May I no longer be regarded as Heracles' mother! If you lay a hand on them, you will struggle ignominiously wihildren while I still live. May I no longer be regarded as Heracles' mother! If you lay a hand on them, you will struggle ignominiously with a pair of grey-heads. Iolaus Courage, old woman, do not be afraid. No herald has come from Argos with hostile message. Alcmene Then why did you raise the shout that is the herald of fear? Iolaus So that you would come out of the temple and approach him. Alcmene I don't understand this. Who is he? Iolaus He brings word that your grandson has returned.
Argive (Greece) (search for this): card 660
t it is. It is my task to inquire into this. Servant Which events do you want to learn of? Iolaus How large an allied force has he arrived with? Servant A large one. The number beyond this I cannot tell you. Iolaus The Athenian leaders, I suppose, are aware of this. Servant Yes, and what is more, they have posted them on our left wing. Iolaus What? Is the force already armed for battle? Servant Yes, and sacrificial victims have been brought to each company. Iolaus How far off is the Argive force? Servant Close enough to see their general clearly. Iolaus What is he doing? Marshalling the enemy ranks? Servant That was our guess. We could not hear him clearly. But I shall go. I would not like to see my masters closing on the enemy deprived of my part in their defense. Iolaus I shall go with you. For we have the same thought, it seems, to stand by our friends and help them. Servant It is most unlike you to utter such a foolish thought. Iolaus Unlike me, too, to fail to joi
Euboea (Greece) (search for this): card 73
the feeble old man lying spread upon the ground! O unhappy man, at whose hands have you had this wretched fall? Iolaus This man, strangers, dishonors your gods and drags me by force from the altar steps. Chorus But you, old sir, from what land have you come to this people who dwell together in four cities?The Marathonian tetrapolis (Marathon, Oenoe, Probalinthus, and Tricorythus) was an old confederacy of towns that existed before the unification of Attica under Theseus. Have you left the shore of Euboea and put in from beyond the water with sea-going oar? Iolaus It is no islander's life that I live. We have come to your land from Mycenae. Chorus What is the name the people of Mycenae call you? Iolaus You know, I'm sure, of Iolaus, the man who stood at Heracles' side. I am not unknown to fame. Chorus I have heard of you before. But whose are the young children you lead by the hand? Tell us. Iolaus They are Heracles' sons, strangers, who have come as suppliants to you and your c
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