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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Rhesus (ed. E. P. Coleridge).

Found 216 total hits in 63 results.

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Argive (Greece) (search for this): card 565
What can it mean? Has his company withdrawn elsewhere? Diomedes Perhaps to form some stratagem against us. Odysseus Yes, for Hector is bold now, by reason of his victory, bold. Diomedes What then are we to do, Odysseus? We have not found the man asleep; our hopes are dashed. Odysseus Let us go to the fleet with what speed we may. Some god, whichever it be that gives him his good luck, is preserving him; against fate we must not strive. Diomedes Then should we two not go against Aeneas or Paris, most hateful of Phrygians, and with our swords cut off their heads? Odysseus Well, how in the darkness can you find them among a hostile army, and slay them without risk? Diomedes Yet it would be shameful to go to the Argive ships if we have done the enemy no harm. Odysseus What! no harm! Have we not slain Dolon who spied upon the anchored fleet, and have we not his spoils safe here? Or do you expect to sack the entire camp? Diomedes I agree, let us return; and good luck go with us!
Paris (France) (search for this): card 565
What can it mean? Has his company withdrawn elsewhere? Diomedes Perhaps to form some stratagem against us. Odysseus Yes, for Hector is bold now, by reason of his victory, bold. Diomedes What then are we to do, Odysseus? We have not found the man asleep; our hopes are dashed. Odysseus Let us go to the fleet with what speed we may. Some god, whichever it be that gives him his good luck, is preserving him; against fate we must not strive. Diomedes Then should we two not go against Aeneas or Paris, most hateful of Phrygians, and with our swords cut off their heads? Odysseus Well, how in the darkness can you find them among a hostile army, and slay them without risk? Diomedes Yet it would be shameful to go to the Argive ships if we have done the enemy no harm. Odysseus What! no harm! Have we not slain Dolon who spied upon the anchored fleet, and have we not his spoils safe here? Or do you expect to sack the entire camp? Diomedes I agree, let us return; and good luck go with us!
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 882
Chorus Why does fate change and bring Troy once again to mourning after her great good fortune, planting what seeds? Oh, oh! What deity above our heads, O king, bears in her hands as on a bier the newly slain corpse? I shudder at this sight of woe.
Argive (Greece) (search for this): card 833
with your subtle words, you yourself a barbarian? You did this deed; neither they who have died nor we who are wounded will believe it was any other. A long and clever speech you'll need to prove to me you did not slay your friends because you coveted the horses, and to gain them murdered your own allies, after strongly imposing on them come. They came, they are dead; Paris found more decent means to shame the rights of hospitality than you, who killed your allies. No, do not tell me some Argive came and slaughtered us. Who could have passed the Trojan lines and come against us without detection? You and your Phrygian troops were camped in front of us. Who was wounded, who was slain among your friends, when that foe you speak of came? It was we, far off, were wounded, while some have met a sterner fate and said farewell to the sunlight. Briefly, then, I blame no Achaean. For what enemy could have come and found the lowly bed of Rhesus in the dark, unless some god were guiding the
Achaia (Greece) (search for this): card 833
was wounded, who was slain among your friends, when that foe you speak of came? It was we, far off, were wounded, while some have met a sterner fate and said farewell to the sunlight. Briefly, then, I blame no Achaean. For what enemy could have come and found the lowly bed of Rhesus in the dark, unless some god were guiding the murderers' steps? They did not know so much as know of his arrival. No, this is your plot! Hector For a long time now I have had to do with allies, yes, ever since Achaea's army settled in this land, and never a harsh word have I known them say of me; but with you I am to make a beginning. Never may such longing for horses seize me that I should slay my friends! This is the work of Odysseus; for who of all the Argives but he would have devised or carried out such a deed? I fear him; and my mind is a little troubled lest he should have met and slain Dolon as well; for he has been gone a long time and does not appear. Charioteer I do not know this Odysseus
Argive (Greece) (search for this): card 488
. Rhesus Why, it was surely said he sailed to Ilium. Hector He sailed and he is here; but he is angry and takes no part with the other chieftains in the battle. Rhesus Who next to him has won a name in their army? Hector Aias and the son of Tydeus are, I take it, in no way his inferiors; there is Odysseus, a wheedling rascal, but bold enough indeed, and of all men he has wrought most outrage on this country. For he came by night to Athena's shrine and stole her image and took it to the Argive ships; next he came inside our battlements, clad as a vagrant in a beggar's garb, and loudly did he curse the Argives, sent as a spy to Ilium; and then went out again, when he had slain the sentinels and warders at the gate. He is always to be found lurking in ambush about the altar of Thymbrean Apollo near the city. In him we have a troubling pest to wrestle with. Rhesus No brave man thinks it right to kill his foe in secret, but to meet him face to face. If I can catch this fellow alive
Ilium (Turkey) (search for this): card 488
are ashamed, after all your previous toil, to have no share in firing their ships' prows, place me face to face with Achilles and his army. Hector Against that man you cannot range your eager spear. Rhesus Why, it was surely said he sailed to Ilium. Hector He sailed and he is here; but he is angry and takes no part with the other chieftains in the battle. Rhesus Who next to him has won a name in their army? Hector Aias and the son of Tydeus are, I take it, in no way his inferiors; thereutrage on this country. For he came by night to Athena's shrine and stole her image and took it to the Argive ships; next he came inside our battlements, clad as a vagrant in a beggar's garb, and loudly did he curse the Argives, sent as a spy to Ilium; and then went out again, when he had slain the sentinels and warders at the gate. He is always to be found lurking in ambush about the altar of Thymbrean Apollo near the city. In him we have a troubling pest to wrestle with. Rhesus No brave ma
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 488
e sentinels and warders at the gate. He is always to be found lurking in ambush about the altar of Thymbrean Apollo near the city. In him we have a troubling pest to wrestle with. Rhesus No brave man thinks it right to kill his foe in secret, but to meet him face to face. If I can catch this fellow alive, who, as you say, sits in stealthy ambush and plots his mischief, I will impale him at the outlet of the gates and set him up for winged vultures to make their meal upon. This is the death he ought to die, pirate and temple-robber that he is. Hector To your quarters now, for it is night. For you I will myself point out a spot where your army can watch this night apart from our array. Our password is “Phoebus”, if perhaps there should be need of it; hear and remember it, and tell it to the Thracian army. You must advance in front of our ranks and keep a watchful guard, and receive Dolon, who went to spy on the ships, for he, if he is safe, is even now approaching the camp of Troy
Argive (Greece) (search for this): card 820
Chorus Woe, woe! It was in quest of you, yes, you, great lord of my city, that I went, when I brought news to you that the Argive army was kindling fires about the ships; for by the springs of Simois I vow my eye kept sleepless watch by night, nor did I slumber or sleep. Do not be angry with me, my lord; I am guiltless of all. Yet if hereafter you find that I in word or deed have done amiss, bury me alive beneath the earth; I ask no mercy.
Argos (Greece) (search for this): card 467
dy to achieve to atone for my long absence; (with due submission to Nemesis I say this); then when we have cleared this city of its foes and you have chosen out first-fruits for the gods, I wish to march with you against the Argives' country and at my coming lay Hellas waste with war, that they in turn may know the taste of ill. Hector If I could rid the city of this present curse and restore it to its old security, I should indeed feel deep gratitude towards the gods. But, as for sacking Argos and the pasture-lands of Hellas with the spear, it is no such easy task as you say. Rhesus Do they not say that here came the greatest chiefs of Hellas? Hector Yes, and I do not scorn them; I have enough to do in driving them away. Rhesus Well, when we slay these, is our task not fully done? Hector Do not leave the present need to look to distant schemes. Rhesus You are, it seems, content to suffer and make no return. Hector Yes, for I rule a great empire, even though I am here. But
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