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Hellespont (Turkey) (search for this): book 7, chapter 36
So this was done by those who were appointed to the thankless honor, and new engineers set about making the bridges. They made the bridges as follows: in order to lighten the strain of the cables, they placed fifty-oared ships and triremes alongside each other, three hundred and sixty to bear the bridge nearest the Euxine sea, and three hundred and fourteen to bear the other; all lay obliquely to the line of the Pontus and parallel with the current of the Hellespont.Or it may mean, as Stein thinks, that the ships of the upper or N.E. bridge were e)pikarsi/ai, and those of the lower or S.W. one were kata\ r(o/on. For a discussion of the various difficulties and interpretations of the whole passage, see How and Wells' notes, ad loc. After putting the ships together they let down very great anchors, both from the end of the ships on the Pontus side to hold fast against the winds blowing from within that sea, and from the other end, towards the west and the Aegean, to hold against the wes
Or it may mean, as Stein thinks, that the ships of the upper or N.E. bridge were e)pikarsi/ai, and those of the lower or S.W. one were kata\ r(o/on. For a discussion of the various difficulties and interpretations of the whole passage, see How and Wells' notes, ad loc. After putting the ships together they let down very great anchors, both from the end of the ships on the Pontus side to hold fast against the winds blowing from within that sea, and from the other end, towards the west and the Aegean, to hold against the west and south winds. They left a narrow opening to sail through in the line of fifty-oared ships and triremes, that so whoever wanted to could sail by small craft to the Pontus or out of it. After doing this, they stretched the cables from the land, twisting them taut with wooden windlasses; they did not as before keep the two kinds apart, but assigned for each bridge two cables of flax and four of papyrus. All these had the same thickness and fine appearance, but the f
they placed fifty-oared ships and triremes alongside each other, three hundred and sixty to bear the bridge nearest the Euxine sea, and three hundred and fourteen to bear the other; all lay obliquely to the line of the Pontus and parallel with the cuPontus and parallel with the current of the Hellespont.Or it may mean, as Stein thinks, that the ships of the upper or N.E. bridge were e)pikarsi/ai, and those of the lower or S.W. one were kata\ r(o/on. For a discussion of the various difficulties and interpretations of the whole' notes, ad loc. After putting the ships together they let down very great anchors, both from the end of the ships on the Pontus side to hold fast against the winds blowing from within that sea, and from the other end, towards the west and the Aegeanto sail through in the line of fifty-oared ships and triremes, that so whoever wanted to could sail by small craft to the Pontus or out of it. After doing this, they stretched the cables from the land, twisting them taut with wooden windlasses; they