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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Homer, Odyssey. Search the whole document.

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Thrace (Greece) (search for this): book 8, card 343
he immortal gods, if Ares should avoid both the debt and the bonds and depart?” Then again Poseidon, the earth-shaker, answered him:“Hephaestus, even if Ares shall avoid the debt and flee away, I will myself pay thee this.” Then the famous god of the two strong arms answered him: “It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly.” So saying the mighty Hephaestus loosed the bondsand the two, when they were freed from that bond so strong, sprang up straightway. And Ares departed to Thrace, but she, the laughter-loving Aphrodite, went to Cyprus, to Paphos, where is her demesne and fragrant altar. There the Graces bathed her and anointed her withimmortal oil, such as gleams1 upon the gods that are forever. And they clothed her in lovely raiment, a wonder to behold. This song the famous minstrel sang; and Odysseus was glad at heart as he listened, and so too were the Phaeacians of the long oars, men famed for their ships. Then Alcinous bade Halius and Laodamas dance alone, fo
Paphos (Cyprus) (search for this): book 8, card 343
and depart?” Then again Poseidon, the earth-shaker, answered him:“Hephaestus, even if Ares shall avoid the debt and flee away, I will myself pay thee this.” Then the famous god of the two strong arms answered him: “It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly.” So saying the mighty Hephaestus loosed the bondsand the two, when they were freed from that bond so strong, sprang up straightway. And Ares departed to Thrace, but she, the laughter-loving Aphrodite, went to Cyprus, to Paphos, where is her demesne and fragrant altar. There the Graces bathed her and anointed her withimmortal oil, such as gleams1 upon the gods that are forever. And they clothed her in lovely raiment, a wonder to behold. This song the famous minstrel sang; and Odysseus was glad at heart as he listened, and so too were the Phaeacians of the long oars, men famed for their ships. Then Alcinous bade Halius and Laodamas dance alone, for no one could vie with them. And when they had taken in their hand
Cyprus (Cyprus) (search for this): book 8, card 343
the bonds and depart?” Then again Poseidon, the earth-shaker, answered him:“Hephaestus, even if Ares shall avoid the debt and flee away, I will myself pay thee this.” Then the famous god of the two strong arms answered him: “It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly.” So saying the mighty Hephaestus loosed the bondsand the two, when they were freed from that bond so strong, sprang up straightway. And Ares departed to Thrace, but she, the laughter-loving Aphrodite, went to Cyprus, to Paphos, where is her demesne and fragrant altar. There the Graces bathed her and anointed her withimmortal oil, such as gleams1 upon the gods that are forever. And they clothed her in lovely raiment, a wonder to behold. This song the famous minstrel sang; and Odysseus was glad at heart as he listened, and so too were the Phaeacians of the long oars, men famed for their ships. Then Alcinous bade Halius and Laodamas dance alone, for no one could vie with them. And when they had taken in