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And you, gentlemen of the jury, took them in when they were banished; you made them citizens and granted them a share of all your privileges. Remembering, after more than a hundred and fifty years,The Athenians sent women and children to Troezen before the battle of Salamis. (See Cic. de Offic. 3. 11.48.) Hence we have a rough terminus post quem for the speech. the help they gave you against the barbarian, you felt that when men had been of service to you in times of danger you should protect them in their misfortune. But this abandoned wretch, who forsook you and was enrolled at Troezen, engaged in nothing that was worthy either of the constitution or the spirit of that city. He treated those who had welcomed him so cruelly that . . . in the Assembly . . . fled.The sense appears to be, as Colin suggests, that he was accused in the Assemhly of the Troezenians, and, fearing punishment, fled back to Athens
And you, gentlemen of the jury, took them in when they were banished; you made them citizens and granted them a share of all your privileges. Remembering, after more than a hundred and fifty years,The Athenians sent women and children to Troezen before the battle of Salamis. (See Cic. de Offic. 3. 11.48.) Hence we have a rough terminus post quem for the speech. the help they gave you against the barbarian, you felt that when men had been of service to you in times of danger you should protect when men had been of service to you in times of danger you should protect them in their misfortune. But this abandoned wretch, who forsook you and was enrolled at Troezen, engaged in nothing that was worthy either of the constitution or the spirit of that city. He treated those who had welcomed him so cruelly that . . . in the Assembly . . . fled.The sense appears to be, as Colin suggests, that he was accused in the Assemhly of the Troezenians, and, fearing punishment, fled back to Athe