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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Isocrates, Panegyricus (ed. George Norlin). Search the whole document.

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Gardner (Ohio, United States) (search for this): speech 4, section 28
two gifts, the greatest in the world—the fruits of the earth,Cf. Plat. Menex. 237e; Lucret. vi. 1 ff. which have enabled us to rise above the life of the beasts, and the holy riteFor the Eleusinian Mysteries see Lobeck, Aglaophamus, vol. i; Gardner and Jevons, Manual of Greek Antiquities, pp. 274 ff.; Gardner's New Chapters in Greek History, xiii; Diehl, Excursions in Greece viii. which inspires in those who partake of it sweeter hopesQuoted in Isoc. 8.34. For the blessedness of rise above the life of the beasts, and the holy riteFor the Eleusinian Mysteries see Lobeck, Aglaophamus, vol. i; Gardner and Jevons, Manual of Greek Antiquities, pp. 274 ff.; Gardner's New Chapters in Greek History, xiii; Diehl, Excursions in Greece viii. which inspires in those who partake of it sweeter hopesQuoted in Isoc. 8.34. For the blessedness of the Mystics see HH Dem. 480 ff.; Pindar, Fr. 102; Sophocles, Fr. 753 Nauck. regarding both the end of life and all eternity
es v. 385 ff.; Claudian, De raptu Proserpinae, and Walter Pater, “Demeter and Persephone” in his Greek Studies. has taken the form of a myth, yet it deserves to be told again. When Demeter came to our land, in her wandering after the rape of Kore, and, being moved to kindness towards our ancestors by services which may not be told save to her initiates, gave these two gifts, the greatest in the world—the fruits of the earth,Cf. Plat. Menex. 237e; Lucret. vi. 1 ff. which have enabled us to rise above the life of the beasts, and the holy riteFor the Eleusinian Mysteries see Lobeck, Aglaophamus, vol. i; Gardner and Jevons, Manual of Greek Antiquities, pp. 274 ff.; Gardner's New Chapters in Greek History, xiii; Diehl, Excursions in Greece viii. which inspires in those who partake of it sweeter hopesQuoted in Isoc. 8.34. For the blessedness of the Mystics see HH Dem. 480 ff.; Pindar, Fr. 102; Sophocles, Fr. 753 Nauck. regarding both the end of life and all eter