hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jerusalem (Israel) 44 0 Browse Search
Judea (Israel) 42 0 Browse Search
Syria (Syria) 22 0 Browse Search
Arabia 18 0 Browse Search
Euphrates 16 0 Browse Search
Rome (Italy) 14 0 Browse Search
Egypt (Egypt) 12 0 Browse Search
Jericho (Israel) 10 0 Browse Search
Scythopolis (Israel) 10 0 Browse Search
Damascus (Syria) 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.). Search the whole document.

Found 9 total hits in 3 results.

In the mean time, Crassus came as successor to Gabinius in Syria. He took away all the rest of the gold belonging to the temple of Jerusalem, in order to furnish himself for his expedition against the Parthians. He also took away the two thousand talents which Pompey had not touched; but when he had passed over Euphrates, he perished himself, and his army with him; concerning which affairs this is not a proper time to speak [more largely].
In the mean time, Crassus came as successor to Gabinius in Syria. He took away all the rest of the gold belonging to the temple of Jerusalem, in order to furnish himself for his expedition against the Parthians. He also took away the two thousand talents which Pompey had not touched; but when he had passed over Euphrates, he perished himself, and his army with him; concerning which affairs this is not a proper time to speak [more largely].
Jerusalem (Israel) (search for this): book 1, section 179
In the mean time, Crassus came as successor to Gabinius in Syria. He took away all the rest of the gold belonging to the temple of Jerusalem, in order to furnish himself for his expedition against the Parthians. He also took away the two thousand talents which Pompey had not touched; but when he had passed over Euphrates, he perished himself, and his army with him; concerning which affairs this is not a proper time to speak [more largely].