hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 62 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 60 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 60 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 58 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 56 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 52 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Acharnians (ed. Anonymous) 46 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 46 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 44 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 44 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Lysias, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Athens (Greece) or search for Athens (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 52 results in 48 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
Lysias, Against Agoratus, section 24 (search)
The councillors, having duly noted the names of those who tendered bail and stopped the arrest, went off to town. Then Agoratus and his sureties seated themselves at the altar on Munichia.The citadel on the east side of the Peiraeus, containing an altar of Artemis. Seated there, they debated the question of what should be done. The sureties and everyone else were of opinion that they should get Agoratus out of the way as quickly as possible, and having brought two vessels alongside they begged him at all costs to quit Athens,
Lysias, Against Andocides, section 25 (search)
Why, nobody to this day, throughout the ever-memorable history of Athens, has been disqualified on so grave a charge. And justly; for neither has anyone to this day committed such acts. Should we attribute these results to the gods, or to mere chance?
And you should consider that, in the Peiraeus party, those who are in highest repute, who have run the greatest risk, and who have rendered you the most services, had often before exhorted your people to abide by their oaths and covenants, since they held this to be the bulwark of democracy: for they felt that it would give the party of the town immunity from the consequences of the past,Those who had remained in Athens under the Thirty were for long held in suspicion by the restored democrats. and the party of the Peiraeus an assurance of the most lasting permanence of the constitution.
Now I, men of Athens, am not debarred on account either of means or of birth, but in both respects have the advantage of my opponents; and I consider that the only deliverance for the city is to let all Athenians share the citizenship. For when we possessed our walls, our ships, and money and allies, far from proposing to exclude any Athenian, we actually granted the right of marriage to the Euboeans.Normally the marriage tie was only recognized as between persons of Athenian birth. Shall we debar today even our existing citizens?
Lysias, Against Eratosthenes, section 36 (search)
And how monstrous it would be, when you have punished with death the commanders who won the victory at seaAt Arginusae, 406 B.C.—they said that a storm prevented them from picking up the men in the water, but you felt that you must make them give satisfaction to the I valor of the dead—if these men, who as ordinary persons used their utmost endeavors towards your defeat in the sea-fights,It was suspected that both at Arginusae and at Aegospotami members of the oligarchic party had been working for the defeat of Athens by Sparta. and then, once established in power, admit that of their own free will they put to death many of the citizens without a trial,—if these men, I say, and their children are not to be visited by you with the extreme penalty of the
Lysias, On the Property of Aristophanes, section 36 (search)
Furthermore, there is no evidence of any dispute having occurred between them; so probably in regard to money they agreed in deciding that each should leave his son with a competence here,In Athens. while keeping the rest in his own hands.In Cyprus. For Conon had a son and a wife in Cyprus, and Nicophemus a wife and a daughter, and they also felt that their property there was just as safe as their property here.
Lysias, For Mantitheus, section 4 (search)
ore the disaster at the Hellespont,At Aegospotami, 405 B.C. had sent us abroad to live at the court of Satyrus, on the Pontus.At Panticapaeum in the east corner of the Tauric Chersonese (Crimea), capital of the Kingdom of Bosphorus, which exported corn to Athens. We were not residing in Athens either when the walls were being demolished or when the constitution was being changed.In the spring of 404 B.C. We came here five days before the people at Phyle returned to the Peiraeus.In May, 403 B.C. ore the disaster at the Hellespont,At Aegospotami, 405 B.C. had sent us abroad to live at the court of Satyrus, on the Pontus.At Panticapaeum in the east corner of the Tauric Chersonese (Crimea), capital of the Kingdom of Bosphorus, which exported corn to Athens. We were not residing in Athens either when the walls were being demolished or when the constitution was being changed.In the spring of 404 B.C. We came here five days before the people at Phyle returned to the Peiraeus.In May, 4
Lysias, On the Scrutiny of Evandros, section 4 (search)
But I find no difficulty in countering those statements. As regards the public services, I say that his father would have done better not to perform them than to spend so much of his substance: for it was on account of this that he won the confidence of the people and overthrew the democracy; and so our memory of these deeds must be more abiding than of the offerings he has set upIn the temples at Athens, Delphi, etc. in record of those services.
Lysias, Against Andocides, section 41 (search)
There is no truth, men of Athens, in this defence of his; do not let yourselves be deceived. You have a breach of the agreements, not if Andocides is punished for his private offences, but if private requital is exacted from a man on account of public misfortunes.
Lysias, Against Agoratus, section 43 (search)
So then these persons, men of Athens, lost their lives through the depositions of Agoratus. But after the Thirty had cleared them out of their way, you know well enough, I imagine, what a multitude of miseries next befell the city; and for all of them this man, by taking those people's lives, was responsible.
1 2 3 4 5