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Hyperides, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 6 0 Browse Search
Plato, Alcibiades 1, Alcibiades 2, Hipparchus, Lovers, Theages, Charmides, Laches, Lysis 6 0 Browse Search
Isaeus, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 6 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Eunuchus (ed. Edward St. John Parry, Edward St. John Parry, M.A.) 6 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for Athens (Greece) or search for Athens (Greece) in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 1, chapter 9 (search)
day, which places the sacrifices to the god for the pentathlum and chariot-races second, and those for the other competitions first, was fixed at the seventy-seventh Festival. Previously the contests for men and for horses were held on the same day. But at the Festival I mentioned the pancratiasts prolonged their contests till night-fall, because they were not summoned to the arena soon enough. The cause of the delay was partly the chariot-race, but still more the pentathlum. Callias of Athens was champion of the pancratiasts on this occasion, but never afterwards was the pancratium to be interfered with by the pentathlum or the chariots. The rules for the presidents of the games are not the same now as they were at the first institution of the festival. Iphitus acted as sole president, as likewise did the descendants of Oxylus after Iphitus. But at the fiftieth Festival two men, appointed by lot from all the Eleans, were entrusted with the management of the Olympic games, and f
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 2, chapter 9 (search)
h, was made by the Spartan Cratinus.As regards the chariot of Gelon, I did not come to the same opinion about it as my predecessors, who hold that the chariot is an offering of the Gelon who became tyrant in Sicily. Now there is an inscription on the chariot that it was dedicated by Gelon of Gela, son of Deinomenes, and the date of the victory of this Gelon is the seventy-third Festival488 B.C.. But the Gelon who was tyrant of Sicily took possession of Syracuse when Hybrilides was archon at Athens, in the second year of the seventy-second Olympiad491 B.C., when Tisicrates of Croton won the foot-race. Plainly, therefore, he would have announced himself as of Syracuse, not Gela. The fact is that this Gelon must be a private person, of the same name as the tyrant, whose father had the same name as the tyrant's father. It was Glaucias of Aegina who made both the chariot and the portrait-statue of Gelon. At the Festival previous to this it is said that Cleomedes of Astypalaea killed Iccus
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Achaia, chapter 9 (search)
. They persuaded to go up to Rome the exiles of the Achaeans, along with the Messenians who had been held to be involved in the death of Philopoemen and banished on that account by the Achaeans. Going up with them to Rome they intrigued for the restoration of the exiles. As Appius was a zealous supporter of the Lacedaemonians and opposed the Achaeans in everything, the plans of the Messenian and Achaean exiles were bound to enjoy an easy success. Despatches were at once sent by the senate to Athens and Aetolia, with instructions to bring back the Messenians and Achaeans to their homes. This caused the greatest vexation to the Achaeans. They bethought themselves of the injustice they had suffered at the hands of the Romans, and how all their services had proved of no avail; to please the Romans they had made war against Philip, against the Aetolians and afterwards against Antiochus, and after all there was preferred before them a band of exiles, whose hands were stained with blood. Neve
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