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Snell (Virginia, United States) (search for this): book N., poem 7
use of the god, and dwell there to preside over the processions of heroes, which are honored by many sacrifices.Following Snell's punctuation, period after poluqu/ tois and after e)kgo/nwn, below. As for their justly earned good name, a few words wiently. Anyone who knows the truth will declare whether I follow a path that is out of tune, singing a twistedReading with Snell ya/gion for yo/gion. song.Sogenes, of the Euxenid clan, I swear that I did not overstep the line when I hurled, like a brng of gods. For they say that he planted the seed of Aeacus, received by the mother, to be a city-ruler in myReading with Snell and MSS e)ma=| for e(a=|. illustrious fatherland, and to be a kindly Reading with Snell propra/on' for proprew=n'. friendSnell propra/on' for proprew=n'. friend and brother to you, Heracles. If one man has any benefit from another, we would say that a neighbor, if he loves his neighbor with an earnest mind, is a joy worth any price. But if a god should also uphold this truth,then under your protection, Her
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): book N., poem 7
Nemean 7 For Sogenes of Aegina Boys' Pentathlon ?467 B. C. On the uncertainty of the date, see C. Carey,A Commentary on Five Odes of Pindar (New York 1981), p. 133.Eleithuia, seated beside the deep-thinking Fates, hear me, creator of offspring, child of Hera great in strength. Without you we see neither the light nor the dark night before it is our lot to go to your sister, Hebe, Youth with her lovely limbs.Yet we do not all draw our first breath for equal ends. Under the yoke of destiny, diffexpect it, and on the one who does. There is honor for those whose fame a god causes to grow luxuriant when they are dead. Neoptolemus came to help,Adding a period after teqnako/twn and reading with C. Carey, A Commentary on Five Odes of Pindar New York 1981, 148-50, boaqe/wn . . . mo/len. to the great navel of the broad-bosomed earth. And he lies beneath the Pythian soil,after he sacked the city of Priam, where even the Danaans toiled. But on his return voyage he missed Scyros, and after wande
Troy (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): book N., poem 7
Commentary on Five Odes of Pindar New York 1981, 148-50, boaqe/wn . . . mo/len. to the great navel of the broad-bosomed earth. And he lies beneath the Pythian soil,after he sacked the city of Priam, where even the Danaans toiled. But on his return voyage he missed Scyros, and after wandering from their course they came to Ephyra. He ruled in Molossia for a brief time; and his race always borethis honor of his. He had gone to consult the god, bringing precious things from the finest spoils of Troy; and there he met with a quarrel over the flesh of his sacrifice, and a man struck him with a knife. The hospitable Delphians were grieved beyond measure; but he fulfilled his fate. It was destined that within that most ancient grove oneof the ruling race of Aeacus should, for all time to come, stay beside the fine-walled house of the god, and dwell there to preside over the processions of heroes, which are honored by many sacrifices.Following Snell's punctuation, period after poluqu/ tois an
Nemean 7 For Sogenes of Aegina Boys' Pentathlon ?467 B. C. On the uncertainty of the date, see C. Carey,A Commentary on Five Odes of Pindar (New York 1981), p. 133.Eleithuia, seated beside the deep-thinking Fates, hear me, creator of offspring, child of Hera great in strength. Without you we see neither the light nor the dark night before it is our lot to go to your sister, Hebe, Youth with her lovely limbs.Yet we do not all draw our first breath for equal ends. Under the yoke of destiny, diffit, and on the one who does. There is honor for those whose fame a god causes to grow luxuriant when they are dead. Neoptolemus came to help,Adding a period after teqnako/twn and reading with C. Carey, A Commentary on Five Odes of Pindar New York 1981, 148-50, boaqe/wn . . . mo/len. to the great navel of the broad-bosomed earth. And he lies beneath the Pythian soil,after he sacked the city of Priam, where even the Danaans toiled. But on his return voyage he missed Scyros, and after wandering fr
Nemean 7 For Sogenes of Aegina Boys' Pentathlon ?467 B. C. On the uncertainty of the date, see C. Carey,A Commentary on Five Odes of Pindar (New York 1981), p. 133.Eleithuia, seated beside the deep-thinking Fates, hear me, creator of offspring, child of Hera great in strength. Without you we see neither the light nor the dark night before it is our lot to go to your sister, Hebe, Youth with her lovely limbs.Yet we do not all draw our first breath for equal ends. Under the yoke of destiny, different men are held by different restraints. But it is by your favor that, even so, Sogenes the son of Thearion, distinguished by his excellence, is celebrated in song as glorious among pentathletes. For he lives in a city that loves music, the city of the Aeacidae with their clashing spears;and they very much want to foster a spirit familiar with contests. If someone is successful in his deeds, he casts a cause for sweet thoughts into the streams of the Muses. For those great acts of prowess dw