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when we reach this point in our legislation—that the latter should impart these lessons gently, and the former receive them gratefully. Nor should we omit such mimic dances as are fitting for use by our choirs,—for instance, the sword-dance of the CuretesPriests of the Idaean Zeus. here in Crete, and that of the DioscoriCastor and Pollux. in Lacedaemon; and at Athens, too, our Virgin-LadyAthene. gladdened by the pastime of the dance deemed it not seemly to sport with empty han
Lacedaemon (Greece) (search for this): book 7, section 796b
when we reach this point in our legislation—that the latter should impart these lessons gently, and the former receive them gratefully. Nor should we omit such mimic dances as are fitting for use by our choirs,—for instance, the sword-dance of the CuretesPriests of the Idaean Zeus. here in Crete, and that of the DioscoriCastor and Pollux. in Lacedaemon; and at Athens, too, our Virgin-LadyAthene. gladdened by the pastime of the dance deemed it not seemly to sport with empty han
when we reach this point in our legislation—that the latter should impart these lessons gently, and the former receive them gratefully. Nor should we omit such mimic dances as are fitting for use by our choirs,—for instance, the sword-dance of the CuretesPriests of the Idaean Zeus. here in Crete, and that of the DioscoriCastor and Pollux. in Lacedaemon; and at Athens, too, our Virgin-LadyAthene. gladdened by the pastime of the dance deemed it not seemly to sport with empty han