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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Plato, Parmenides. Search the whole document.

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Zeno (Ohio, United States) (search for this): text Parm., section 128a
or have I misunderstood?”“No,” said Zeno, “you have grasped perfectly the general intent of the work.”“I see, Parmenides,” said Socrates, “that Zeno here wishes to be very close to you not only in his friendship, but also in his writing. For he has written much the same thing as you, but by reversing the process he tries to cheat us into the belief that he is saying something new. For you, in your poems, say that the all is one, or have I misunderstood?”“No,” said Zeno, “you have grasped perfectly the general intent of the work.”“I see, Parmenides,” said Socrates, “that Zeno here wishes to be very close to you not only in his friendship, but also in his writing. For he has written much the same thing as you, but by reversing the process he tries to cheat us into the belief that he is saying something new. For you, in your
Socrates (Georgia, United States) (search for this): text Parm., section 128a
or have I misunderstood?”“No,” said Zeno, “you have grasped perfectly the general intent of the work.”“I see, Parmenides,” said Socrates, “that Zeno here wishes to be very close to you not only in his friendship, but also in his writing. For he has written much the same thing as you, but by reversing the process he tries to cheat us into the belief that he is saying something new. For you, in your poems, say that