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then they joined hands and passed through the whole of the country, in order that they might be able to report to the king that not a man had escaped out of their hands.Cf. Hdt. v. 99 ff.;Laws iii. 698 C ff. The expedition of Datis took place in 490 B.C. With the same design they sailed off from Eretria to Marathon, supposing that they would have an easy task in leading the Athenians captive under the same yoke of bondage as the Eretrians. And while these actions were being accomplished in part, and in part attempted, not one of the Greeks lent aid to the Eretrians nor yet to the Athenians, save only the Lacedaemonians (and they arrived on the day after the battle); all the rest were terrorstricken, and, hugging their present security,
then they joined hands and passed through the whole of the country, in order that they might be able to report to the king that not a man had escaped out of their hands.Cf. Hdt. v. 99 ff.;Laws iii. 698 C ff. The expedition of Datis took place in 490 B.C. With the same design they sailed off from Eretria to Marathon, supposing that they would have an easy task in leading the Athenians captive under the same yoke of bondage as the Eretrians. And while these actions were being accomplished in part, and in part attempted, not one of the Greeks lent aid to the Eretrians nor yet to the Athenians, save only the Lacedaemonians (and they arrived on the day after the battle); all the rest were terrorstricken, and, hugging their present security,