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Zephyrium (Turkey) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
f" was the southern "part of what is now called the Adriatic Sea" (2. 5. 20); see 7. 5. 8-9. After Heracleium comes a cape belonging to Locris, which is called Zephyrium; its harbor is exposed to the winds that blow from the west, and hence the name. Then comes the city Locri Epizephyrii,Literally, the "western Locrians," both y on the site, the same to be named after Croton. Ephorus is wrong in calling it a colony of the Locri Opuntii. However, they lived only three or four years at Zephyrium, and then moved the city to its present site, with the cooperation of Syracusans [for at the same time the latter, among whom . . .]The Greek text, here translathyrium, by the Lacedaemonians" (3.3); and "Tarentum is a Lacedaemonian colony" (10. 10). Cp. the reference to the Tarantini in Strabo's next paragraph. And at Zephyrium there is a spring, called Locria, where the Locri first pitched camp. The distance from Rhegium to Locri is six hundred stadia. The city is situated on the bro
hat the Samnitae once fortified it against the Thurii. And the old Crimissa, which is near the sames towards Campania are Samnite cities. Beyond Thurii lies also the country that is called Tauriana.üs, and the latter, from Metapontium as far as Thurii; in the second place, on the mainland, from tnitae as far as the isthmus which extends from Thurii to Cerilli (a city near Laüs), the isthmus is the city to another place near by and named it Thurii, after a spring of that name. Now the Sybarisides it cures many afflictions. Now after the Thurii had prospered for a long time, they were ensla changed the name of the city to Copiae. After Thurii comes Lagaria, a stronghold, bounded by Epeiusely well thought of among physicians. That of Thurii, too, is one of the famous wines. Then comes acleia and about three hundred and thirty from Thurii. Writers produce as proof of its settlement bochus, when the Tarantini were at war with the Thurii and their general Cleandridas, an exile from L
from Sicily to gather flowers; and consequently it has become the custom among the women of Hipponium to gather flowers and to weave them into garlands, so that on festival days it is disgraceful to wear bought garlands. Hipponium has also a naval station, which was built long ago by Agathocles, the tyrant of the Siciliotes,The "Siciliotes" were Sicilian Greeks, as distinguished from native Sicilians. when he made himself master of the city. Thence one sails to the Harbor of Heracles,Now Tropea. But in fact the turn towards the west begins immediately after Hipponium. which is the point where the headlands of Italy near the Strait begin to turn towards the west. And on this voyage one passes Medma, a city of the same Locrians aforementioned, which has the same name as a great fountain there, and possesses a naval station near by, called Emporium. Near it is also the Metaurus River, and a mooring-place bearing the same name. Off this coast lie the islands of the Liparaei, at a d
Grumentum (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
work entitled "On the (Homeric) Catalogue of Ships" (cp. 1. 2. 24). in mentioning Philoctetes, says that, according to some, when Philoctetes arrived at the territory of Croton, he colonized the promontory Crimissa, and, in the interior above it, the city Chone, from which the Chonians of that district took their name, and that some of his companions whom he had sent forth with Aegestes the Trojan to the region of Eryx in Sicily fortified Aegesta.Also spelled Segesta and Egesta. Moreover, Grumentum and Vertinae are in the interior, and so are Calasarna and some other small settlements, until we arrive at Venusia, a notable city; but I think that this city and those that follow in order after it as one goes towards Campania are Samnite cities. Beyond Thurii lies also the country that is called Tauriana. The Leucani are Samnite in race, but upon mastering the Poseidoniatae and their allies in war they took possession of their cities. At all other times, it is true, their government
an island, from which it is only a short voyage across to the continent. The island is named after one of the Sirens, who was cast ashore here after the Sirens had flung themselves, as the myth has it, into the depths of the sea. In front of the island lies that promontoryPoseidium, now Punta Della Licosa. which is opposite the Sirenussae and with them forms the Poseidonian Gulf. On doubling this promontory one comes immediately to another gulf, in which there is a city which was called "Hyele" by the Phocaeans who founded it, and by others "Ele," after a certain spring, but is called by the men of today "Elea." This is the native city of Parmenides and Zeno, the Pythagorean philosophers. It is my opinion that not only through the influence of these men but also in still earlier times the city was well governed; and it was because of this good government that the people not only held their own against the Leucani and the Poseidoniatae, but even returned victorious, although the
to avenge those gods, and also to enquire how they, now utterly ruined, might be saved. Apollo bade them go forth with the Chalcidians to Rhegium, and to be grateful to his sister; for, he added, they were not ruined, but saved, inasmuch as they were surely not to perish along with their native land, which would be captured a little later by the Spartans. They obeyed; and therefore the rulers of the Rhegini down to AnaxilasAnaxilas (also spelled Anaxilaüs) was ruler of Rhegium from 494 to 476 B.C. (Diod. Sic. 11.48). were always appointed from the stock of the Messenians. According to Antiochus, the Siceli and Morgetes had in early times inhabited the whole of this region, but later on, being ejected by the Oenotrians, had crossed over into Sicily. According to some, Morgantium also took its name from the Morgetes of Rhegium.Cp. 6. 2. 4. The Latin name of this Sicilian city was "Murgantia." Livy 10.17 refers to another Murgantia in Samnium. The city of Rhegium was once very p
colony of the Locri who live on the Crisaean Gulf,Now the Gulf of Salona in the Gulf of Corinth. which was led out by Evanthes only a little while after the founding of Croton and Syracuse.Croton and Syracuse were founded, respectively, in 710 and 734 B.C. According to Diod. Sic. 4.24, Heracles had unintentionally killed Croton and had foretold the founding of a famous city on the site, the same to be named after Croton. Ephorus is wrong in calling it a colony of the Locri Opuntii. However, came back and founded Croton, having as an associate Archias, the founder of Syracuse, who happened to sail up while on his way to found Syracuse.The generally accepted dates for the founding of Croton and Syracuse are, respectively, 710 B.C. and 734 B.C. But Strabo's account here seems to mean that Syracuse was founded immediately after Croton (cp. 6. 2. 4). Cp. also Thucydides 6. 3. 2 The Iapyges used to live at Croton in earlier times, as Ephorus says. And the city is reputed to have cu
"Teuthras" is otherwise unknown, except that there was a small river of that name, which cannot be identified, near Cumae (see Propertius 1. 11.11 and Silius Italicus 11.288). The river was probably named after Teuthras, king of Teuthrania in Mysia (see 12. 8. 2). But there seems to be no evidence of Sybarites in that region. Meineke and others are probably right in emending to the "Trais" (now the Trionto), on which, according to Diod. Sic. 12.22, certain Sybarites took up their abode in 445 B.C. were founded by the Rhodians. According to Antiochus, when the Tarantini were at war with the Thurii and their general Cleandridas, an exile from Lacedaemon, for the possession of the territory of Siris, they made a compromise and peopled Siris jointly, although it was adjudged the colony of the Tarantini; but later on it was called Heracleia, its site as well as its name being changed. Next in order comes Metapontium, which is one hundred and forty stadia from the naval station of Her
arantini in Strabo's next paragraph. And at Zephyrium there is a spring, called Locria, where the Locri first pitched camp. The distance from Rhegium to Locri is six hundred stadia. The city is situated on the brow of a hill called Epopis. The Locri Epizephyrii are believed to have been the first people to use written laws. After they had lived under good laws for a very long time, Dionysius, on being banished from the country of the Syracusans,Dionysius the Younger was banished thence in 357 B.C. abused them most lawlessly of all men. For he would sneak into the bed-chambers of the girls after they had been dressed up for their wedding, and lie with them before their marriage; and he would gather together the girls who were ripe for marriage, let loose doves with cropped wings upon them in the midst of the banquets, and then bid the girls waltz around unclad, and also bid some of them, shod with sandals that were not mates (one high and the other low), chase the doves around—al
of its fame (for the Samnitae might have called it by the Latin word for "royal,"Regium. because their progenitors had shared in the government with the Romans and used the Latin language to a considerable extent), is open to investigation. Be this as it may, it was a famous city, and not only founded many cities but also produced many notable men, some notable for their excellence as statesmen and others for their learning; nevertheless, DionysiusDionysius the Elder (b. about 432 B.C., d. 367 B.C.) demolished it, they say, on the charge that when he asked for a girl in marriage they proffered the daughter of the public executioner;Diod. Sic. 14.44 merely says that the Assembly of the Rhegini refused him a wife. but his son restored a part of the old city and called it Phoebia.Apparently in honor of Phoebus (Apollo); for, according to Plut. De Alexandri Virtute, (338) Dionysius the Younger called himself the son of Apollo, "offspring of his mother Doris by Phoebus." Now in the
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