hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Greece (Greece) 106 0 Browse Search
Byzantium (Turkey) 42 0 Browse Search
Asia 30 0 Browse Search
Chersonese (Turkey) 22 0 Browse Search
Tigris 20 0 Browse Search
Cilicia (Turkey) 20 0 Browse Search
Armenia (Armenia) 18 0 Browse Search
Paphlagonia (Turkey) 16 0 Browse Search
Cerasus (Turkey) 16 0 Browse Search
Thrace (Greece) 16 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson). Search the whole document.

Found 107 total hits in 23 results.

1 2 3
Lycaonia (Turkey) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
arket” (a)gora\n pare/xein). left their wares behind and took to their heels; while the Greeks with a roar of laughter came up to their camp. Now the Cilician queen was filled with admiration at beholding the brilliant appearance and the order of the Greek army; and Cyrus was delighted to see the terror with which the Greeks inspired the barbarians. Thence he marched three stages, twenty parasangs, to Iconium, the last city of Phrygia. There he remained three days. Thence he marched through Lycaonia five stages, thirty parasangs. This country he gave over to the Greeks to plunder, on the ground that it was hostile territory.In leaving Phrygia Cyrus was passing beyond the limits of his own satrapy. Introd. p. viii. From there Cyrus sent the Cilician queen back to Cilicia by the shortest route, and he sent some of Menon's troops to escort her, Menon himself commanding them. With the rest of the army Cyrus marched through Cappadocia four stages, twenty-five parasangs, to Dana, an inha
Colossae (Turkey) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
I have mentioned; and he marched through Lydia three stages,staqmo/s = lit. a stopping-place, hence a day's journey. a distance of twenty-two parasangs,A Persian measure of distance, equivalent to 30 Greek stadia, or about 3.3 English miles. to the Maeander river. The width of this river was two plethra,The plethrum = about 97 English feet. and there was a bridge over it made of seven boats. After crossing the Maeander he marched through Phrygia one stage, a distance of eight parasangs, to Colossae, an inhabitedMany of the cities of Asia were then, as now, deserted. city, prosperous and large. There he remained seven days; and MenonWho had been sent by Aristippus (see 1 above). the Thessalian arrived, with a thousand hoplites and five hundred peltasts, consisting of Dolopians, Aenianians, and Olynthians. Thence he marched three stages, twenty parasangs, to Celaenae, an inhabited city of Phrygia, large and prosperous. There Cyrus had a palace and a large park full of wild animals, whic
Maeander (Turkey) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
ave mentioned; and he marched through Lydia three stages,staqmo/s = lit. a stopping-place, hence a day's journey. a distance of twenty-two parasangs,A Persian measure of distance, equivalent to 30 Greek stadia, or about 3.3 English miles. to the Maeander river. The width of this river was two plethra,The plethrum = about 97 English feet. and there was a bridge over it made of seven boats. After crossing the Maeander he marched through Phrygia one stage, a distance of eight parasangs, to Colossaethe Great KingA title often given by the Greeks to the king of Persia. in Celaenae, strongly fortified and situated at the foot of the Acropolis over the sources of the Marsyas river; the Marsyas also flows through the city, and empties into the Maeander, and its width is twenty-five feet. It was here, according to the story, that Apollo flayed Marsyas,Marsyas, a Phrygian satyr, was so proud of his skill with the flute that he presumed to challenge Apollo, god of music and master of the lyre. Th
hrough Lycaonia five stages, thirty parasangs. This country he gave over to the Greeks to plunder, on the ground that it was hostile territory.In leaving Phrygia Cyrus was passing beyond the limits of his own satrapy. Introd. p. viii. From there Cyrus sent the Cilician queen back to Cilicia by the shortest route, and he sent some of Menon's troops to escort her, Menon himself commanding them. With the rest of the army Cyrus marched through Cappadocia four stages, twenty-five parasangs, to Dana, an inhabited city, large and prosperous. There they remained three days; and during that time Cyrus put to death a Persian named Megaphernes, who was a wearer of the royal purple,A title of honour at the Persian court. and another dignitary among his subordinates, on the charge that they were plotting against him. From there they made ready to try to enter Cilicia. Now the entrance was by a wagon-road, exceedingly steep and impracticable for an army to pass if there was anybody to oppose it;
s exercise. Through the middle of this park flows the Maeander river; its sources are beneath the palace, and it flows through the city of Celaenae also. There is likewise a palace of the Great KingA title often given by the Greeks to the king of Persia. in Celaenae, strongly fortified and situated at the foot of the Acropolis over the sources of the Marsyas river; the Marsyas also flows through the city, and empties into the Maeander, and its width is twenty-five feet. It was here, according toHe all the while expressed hopes, and was manifestly troubled; for it was not Cyrus' way to withhold payment when he had money. At this juncture arrived Epyaxa, the wife of Syennesis, the king“King” in name, but in fact a dependent of the king of Persia. Syennesis was seeking, as the narrative indicates, to keep on good terms with both Cyrus and Artaxerxes, secretly aiding the former, while still making a show of resistance (see 21 below) to his march. of the Cilicians, coming to visit Cyrus, an
Greece (Greece) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
arsyas, a Phrygian satyr, was so proud of his skill with the flute that he presumed to challenge Apollo, god of music and master of the lyre. The myth appears to be a record of the supersession of the flute by the lyre in Greek favour. after having defeated him in a contest of musical skill; he hung up his skin in the cave from which the sources issue, and it is for this reason that the river is called Marsyas. It was here also, report has it, that Xerxes, when he was on his retreat from Greece after losing the famous battle,viz. of Salamis, in 480 B.C. built the palace just mentioned and likewise the citadel of Celaenae. Here Cyrus remained thirty days; and Clearchus, the Lacedaemonian exile, arrived, with a thousand hoplites, eight hundred Thracian peltasts, and two hundred Cretan bowmen. At the same time came also Sosis the Syracusan with three hundred hoplites and Agias the Arcadian with a thousand hoplites. And here Cyrus held a review and made an enumeration of the Greeks in
Phrygia (Turkey) (search for this): book 1, chapter 2
his river was two plethra,The plethrum = about 97 English feet. and there was a bridge over it made of seven boats. After crossing the Maeander he marched through Phrygia one stage, a distance of eight parasangs, to Colossae, an inhabitedMany of the cities of Asia were then, as now, deserted. city, prosperous and large. There he rend five hundred peltasts, consisting of Dolopians, Aenianians, and Olynthians. Thence he marched three stages, twenty parasangs, to Celaenae, an inhabited city of Phrygia, large and prosperous. There Cyrus had a palace and a large park full of wild animals, which he used to hunt on horseback whenever he wished to give himself and hyrus was delighted to see the terror with which the Greeks inspired the barbarians. Thence he marched three stages, twenty parasangs, to Iconium, the last city of Phrygia. There he remained three days. Thence he marched through Lycaonia five stages, thirty parasangs. This country he gave over to the Greeks to plunder, on the ground
stages, twenty-five parasangs, to Tarsus,The birth-place of the apostle Paul. a large and prosperous city of Cilicia, where the palace of Syennesis, the king of the Cilicians, was situated; and through the middle of the city flows a river named the Cydnus, two plethra in width. The inhabitants of this city had abandoned it and fled, with Syennesis, to a stronghold upon the mountains—all of them, at least, except the tavern-keepers; and there remained also those who dwelt on the sea-coast, in Soli and Issus.Famous as the scene of one of the most important victories of Alexander the Great (333 B.C.). Now Epyaxa, the wife of Syennesis, had reached Tarsus five days ahead of Cyrus, but in the course of her passage over the mountains to the plain two companies of Menon's armycp. 20, above. had been lost. Some said that they had been cut to pieces by the Cilicians while engaged in a bit of plundering; another story was that they had been left behind, and, unable to find the rest of the army
wenty-five parasangs, to Tarsus,The birth-place of the apostle Paul. a large and prosperous city of Cilicia, where the palace of Syennesis, the king of the Cilicians, was situated; and through the middle of the city flows a river named the Cydnus, two plethra in width. The inhabitants of this city had abandoned it and fled, with Syennesis, to a stronghold upon the mountains—all of them, at least, except the tavern-keepers; and there remained also those who dwelt on the sea-coast, in Soli and Issus.Famous as the scene of one of the most important victories of Alexander the Great (333 B.C.). Now Epyaxa, the wife of Syennesis, had reached Tarsus five days ahead of Cyrus, but in the course of her passage over the mountains to the plain two companies of Menon's armycp. 20, above. had been lost. Some said that they had been cut to pieces by the Cilicians while engaged in a bit of plundering; another story was that they had been left behind, and, unable to find the rest of the army or the ro
tus. All these came to Cyrus at Sardis. Meanwhile Tissaphernes had taken note of these proceedings and come to the conclusion that Cyrus' preparations were too extensive to be against the Pisidians; he accordingly made his way to the King as quickly as he could, with about five hundred horsemen. And when the King heard from Tissaphernes about Cyrus' array, he set about making counter-preparations.Cyrus was now setting forth from Sardis with the troops I have mentioned; and he marched through Lydia three stages,staqmo/s = lit. a stopping-place, hence a day's journey. a distance of twenty-two parasangs,A Persian measure of distance, equivalent to 30 Greek stadia, or about 3.3 English miles. to the Maeander river. The width of this river was two plethra,The plethrum = about 97 English feet. and there was a bridge over it made of seven boats. After crossing the Maeander he marched through Phrygia one stage, a distance of eight parasangs, to Colossae, an inhabitedMany of the cities of Asia
1 2 3