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of the month at the rate of a CyziceneA gold coin of Cyzicus, an important Greek city on the Propontis. It was equivalent in weight of gold to l lls. l d. or $7.56; but see note on Xen. Anab. 1.1.9. per month to each man; and I will take you to Troas, the place from which I am an exile, and my city will be at your service; for they will receive me willingly. Then I myself will lead you to places from which you will get an abundance of wealth. I am acquainted with Aeolis, Phrygia, Troas, and tTroas, and the entire province of Pharnabazus,Persian satrap of Lesser Phrygia and Bithynia. partly because I come from that region, and partly because I have campaigned there with Clearchus and Dercylidas.”A Spartan general. He had taken part in the Peloponnesian War, and was the commander under whom the Ten Thousand later served. Next rose Thorax the Boeotian, who was at odds with Xenophon over the generalship of the army, and said that once they got out of the Euxine they would have the Chersonese,
Bithynia (Turkey) (search for this): book 5, chapter 6
t Greek city on the Propontis. It was equivalent in weight of gold to l lls. l d. or $7.56; but see note on Xen. Anab. 1.1.9. per month to each man; and I will take you to Troas, the place from which I am an exile, and my city will be at your service; for they will receive me willingly. Then I myself will lead you to places from which you will get an abundance of wealth. I am acquainted with Aeolis, Phrygia, Troas, and the entire province of Pharnabazus,Persian satrap of Lesser Phrygia and Bithynia. partly because I come from that region, and partly because I have campaigned there with Clearchus and Dercylidas.”A Spartan general. He had taken part in the Peloponnesian War, and was the commander under whom the Ten Thousand later served. Next rose Thorax the Boeotian, who was at odds with Xenophon over the generalship of the army, and said that once they got out of the Euxine they would have the Chersonese, a fair and prosperous country, where any one who so desired might dwell, whi
Paphlagonia (Turkey) (search for this): book 5, chapter 6
Such was the end of that day. On the next the generals called an assembly of the soldiers, and they decided to invite the Sinopeans to join them in deliberating about the rest of their journey. For if they should have to proceed by land, it seemed that the Sinopeans would be useful to them, by virtue of their acquaintance with Paphlagonia; and if they were to go by sea, there was still need, they thought, of the Sinopeans, inasmuch as they were the only people who could provide ships enough for the army. They accordingly invited the ambassadors in and proceeded to take counsel with them, asking them, as Greeks dealing with Greeks, to make a beginning of their kindly reception by showing friendliness and offering the best advice. Then Hecatonymus rose and, in the first place, defended himself in the matter of his remark that they would make a friend of the Paphlagonian, by saying that he did not mean that his own people would make war upon the Greeks, but rather that despite the opport
, and likewise upon a great body of peltasts, bowmen, slingers, and horsemen also, all of them now exceedingly efficient through constant service and all there in Pontus,Xenophon uses the term Po/ntos both of the Euxine Sea and of the region along its south-eastern coast. See below. where so large a force could not have been gatheEuxine Sea and of the region along its south-eastern coast. See below. where so large a force could not have been gathered by any slight outlay of money, it seemed to him that it was a fine thing to gain additional territory and power for Greece by founding a city. It would become a great city, he thought, as he reckoned up their own numbers and the peoples who dwelt around the Euxine. And with a view to this project, before speaking about it to a if they did not provide pay for the troops so that they would have provisions for the voyage from Cotyora, there would be danger of that great force remaining in Pontus. “For Xenophon,” they went on, “wishes and is urging that as soon as the ships come, we should then say all of a sudden to the army: `Soldiers, now we see that yo<
Sinope (Turkey) (search for this): book 5, chapter 6
following behind; second, the Iris, likewise three plethra wide; third, the Halys, not less than two stadia in width, which you could not cross without boats—and who will there be to supply you with boats?—and similarly impassable is the Parthenius also, to which you would come if you should get across the Halys. “For my part, therefore, I believe that this journey is not merely difficult for you, but a thing of utter impossibility. If you go by sea, however, you can coast along from here to Sinope, and from Sinope to Heracleia; and from Heracleia on there is no difficulty either by land or by water, for there are ships in abundance at Heracleia.” When he had thus spoken, some of his hearers were suspicious that he spoke as he did out of friendship for Corylas, for he was his official representative at Sinope; others imagined that he even had the idea of obtaining gifts on account of this advice; while still others suspected that the real purpose of his speech was to prevent the Greek
Phasis (Georgia) (search for this): book 5, chapter 6
ion and Thorax they turned out to be deceivers. Consequently the men who had promised the pay were panic-stricken, and stood in fear of the army. They therefore took with them the other generals to whom they had communicated their earlier doings—namely, all the generals except Neon the Asinaean, who was acting as lieutenant for Cheirisophus because Cheirisophus had not yet returned—and came to Xenophon, with the message that they had changed their minds and thought it was best to sail to the Phasis, inasmuch as there were ships at hand, and seize the land of the Phasians. Their king, as it chanced, was a grandson of Aeetes. Xenophon replied that he would not say a word to the army about this plan; “but,” he went on, “gather the men together and speak to them yourselves, if you wish.” Then Timasion the Dardanian declared it as his opinion that they should not hold an assembly, but that each general should first endeavour to persuade his own captains. So they went away and set about
Silanus (Italy) (search for this): book 5, chapter 6
ore speaking about it to any of the soldiers, he offered sacrifices, summoning for that purpose Silanus the Ambraciot, who had been the soothsayer of Cyrus. Silanus, however, fearing that this thing Silanus, however, fearing that this thing might come to pass and that the army might settle down somewhere, carried forth to the troops a report that Xenophon wanted them to settle down, so that he could found a city and win for himself a name and power. As for Silanus, his own desire was to reach Greece as quickly as possible; for the three thousand darics, which he had received from Cyrus at the time when he sacrificed for him and hadn to speak before you and to act regarding this project, or not to touch the matter at all. Now Silanus, the soothsayer, answered me in respect to the main issue that the omens were favourable (for hr. And whoever is of this opinion,” he continued, “let him raise his hand.” Up went every hand. Silanus, however, began shouting, and attempted to say that it was fair for any one who so chose to lea<
Greece (Greece) (search for this): book 5, chapter 6
y of money, it seemed to him that it was a fine thing to gain additional territory and power for Greece by founding a city. It would become a great city, he thought, as he reckoned up their own numberd found a city and win for himself a name and power. As for Silanus, his own desire was to reach Greece as quickly as possible; for the three thousand darics, which he had received from Cyrus at the tt not, soldiers, to set your thoughts on remaining here, nor to esteem anything more highly than Greece. But I hear that certain people are offering sacrifices over this matter, with not so much as a do this, might return home. It was ridiculous, he said, when there was plenty of fertile land in Greece, to be hunting for it in the domain of the barbarians. “And until you reach that spot,” he conti nor would you come off unharmed. I think, therefore, just as you do, that we should set out for Greece, and that if it does come to pass that any man is caught deserting before the entire army is in
Aeolis (Turkey) (search for this): book 5, chapter 6
you with pay from the first of the month at the rate of a CyziceneA gold coin of Cyzicus, an important Greek city on the Propontis. It was equivalent in weight of gold to l lls. l d. or $7.56; but see note on Xen. Anab. 1.1.9. per month to each man; and I will take you to Troas, the place from which I am an exile, and my city will be at your service; for they will receive me willingly. Then I myself will lead you to places from which you will get an abundance of wealth. I am acquainted with Aeolis, Phrygia, Troas, and the entire province of Pharnabazus,Persian satrap of Lesser Phrygia and Bithynia. partly because I come from that region, and partly because I have campaigned there with Clearchus and Dercylidas.”A Spartan general. He had taken part in the Peloponnesian War, and was the commander under whom the Ten Thousand later served. Next rose Thorax the Boeotian, who was at odds with Xenophon over the generalship of the army, and said that once they got out of the Euxine they wo
Cotyora (Turkey) (search for this): book 5, chapter 6
ad received from Cyrus at the time when he sacrificed for him and had told the truth about the ten days,See Xen. Anab. 1.7.18. he had brought safely through. When the soldiers heard this report, some of them thought it was best to settle down, but the majority thought otherwise. And Timasion the Dardanian and Thorax the Boeotian said to some Heracleot and Sinopean merchants who were there, that if they did not provide pay for the troops so that they would have provisions for the voyage from Cotyora, there would be danger of that great force remaining in Pontus. “For Xenophon,” they went on, “wishes and is urging that as soon as the ships come, we should then say all of a sudden to the army: `Soldiers, now we see that you are without means either to supply yourselves with provisions on the homeward voyage, or to do anything for your people at home when you have got back there; but if you wish to pick out some spot in the country that lies round about the Euxine and put to shore whereve<
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