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ime. Then there came ambassadors to Lacedaemon from383 B.C. Acanthus and Apollonia, which are the largest of tgreat danger is springing up in Greece. To be sure,383 B.C. almost all of you know that Olynthus is the larges the matter of an alliance. Now if so great a power383 B.C. is to be added to the present strength of the Athe deity, perhaps, has so ordered it that men's pride383 B.C. should increase with their power.“We, then, men of each horseman; and if any one of the states should383 B.C. fail to send its contingent to the army, the Lacedook them under his command and began his march. And383 B.C. when they arrived in the district of Thebes, they his way, prepared as he was to depart from Thebes.383 B.C. “And when the proper time arrives,” said Leontiadeas was imprisoned in the Cadmea, then all those who383 B.C. held the same views as Androcleidas and Ismenias ray; but now that this stroke has been accomplished,383 B.C. there is no need of your fearing the Thebans; on t<
ve the Lacedaemonians their support in even more than was demanded of them. After these things had been accomplished, the382 B.C. Lacedaemonians with much more spirit set about dispatching the joint army to Olynthus. They sent out Teleutias as governhes to the various allied states, directing them to follow Teleutias in accordance with the resolution of the allies. And382 B.C. all the states gave their hearty support to Teleutias, — for he was regarded as a man not ungrateful to those who perforrom the city not so much as ten stadia, he halted the army, himself occupying the left wing, — for in this way it fell to382 B.C. him to advance in the direction of the gate where the enemy issued forth, — while the rest of the phalanx, made up of thecause the wall was near. And when a trophy had been set up and this victory had fallen to Teleutias, then as he withdrew382 B.C. he proceeded to cut down the trees. Now after continuing the campaign through this summer he dismissed both the Macedoni<
pedition, saying that the city of the Mantineans had rendered his father many services in the wars against Messene; Agesipolis, therefore, led forth the ban, even385 B.C. though his father, Pausanias, Who was still living, though deposed and in exile.cp. III. v. 25. was on exceedingly friendly terms with the leaders of the popularty, with one half of the soldiers sitting under arms in front of the diggers to protect them, and the other half working. And after the trench had been completed,385 B.C. he then without risk built a wall round about the city. Learning, however, that the corn supply in the city was abundant, since there had been a good harvest the beginning at the city gates, stood the Lacedaemonians with their spears, watching those who were coming out. And although they hated them, nevertheless they kept385 B.C. their hands off them more easily than did the Mantineans belonging to the aristocratic party. Let this, then, stand recorded as a striking example of good discip
zealously than when they were under a democratic government. Thus ended the affair of the Mantineans, whereby men were made wiser in this point at least — not to let a river run through city walls. And now the exiles from Phlius, as they observed384 B.C. that the Lacedaemonians were investigating to see what sort of friends their several allies had proved to be to them during the war, thinking that it was an opportune time, proceeded to Lacedaemon and set forth that so long as they were at home and its people had gone with them on their campaigns wherever they led the way; but that after the Phliasians had driven them into exile, they had declined to follow anywhere, and had refused to receive the Lacedaemonians — and them alone of all384 B.C. men — within their gates. When the ephors heard these things, they decided that the matter deserved attention. Accordingly they sent to the city of the Phliasians and said that the exiles were friends of the Lacedaemonian state and had been exil<
Since in all this matters had proceeded as386 B.C. they desired, the Lacedaemonians resolved, in the case of all among their allies who had been hostile during the war and more favourably inclined toward the enemy than toward Lacedaemon, to chastise them and put them in such a situation that they could not be disloyal. Firstly, therefore, they sent386 B.C. to the Mantineans and ordered them to tear down their wall, saying that they could not trust them in any other way not to take sides with the386 B.C. to the Mantineans and ordered them to tear down their wall, saying that they could not trust them in any other way not to take sides with their enemies. For they said they had noted not only that the Mantineans had been sending corn to the Argives when they themselves were making war upon that people, but also that sometimes, on the pretext of a holy truce, they had not served in the Lacedaemonian armies at all, and when they had fallen into line, had served badly. Furthermore, the Lacedaemonians said they were aware that they were envious if any good fortune came to them, and delighted if any disaster befel them.cp. IV. v. 18. It wa
he Argives when they themselves were making war upon that people, but also that sometimes, on the pretext of a holy truce, they had not served in the Lacedaemonian armies at all, and when they had fallen into line, had served badly. Furthermore, the Lacedaemonians said they were aware that they were envious if any good fortune came to them, and delighted if any disaster befel them.cp. IV. v. 18. It was also common talk that the thirty years' truce, concluded after the battle of Mantinea, In 418 B.C. had expired this year, so far as the Mantineans were concerned. When, accordingly, they now refused to tear down their walls, the Lacedaemonians called out the ban against them.Now Agesilaus requested the state to relieve him of the command of this expedition, saying that the city of the Mantineans had rendered his father many services in the wars against Messene; Agesipolis, therefore, led forth the ban, even385 B.C. though his father, Pausanias, Who was still living, though deposed and in