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the nine. FROM SUIDAS Horatius [Cocles] was a cripple. He failed of reaching the consulship, either in war or in peace, on account of his lameness. FROM SUIDAS The Consuls tendered the oaths [by which they bound themselves], and said that they would yield everything rather than take back Tarquinius. Y.R. 250 FROM PEIRESC Tarquinius incited the Sabines against the Roman people. B.C. 504 Claudius, an influential Sabine of the town of Regillus, opposed any violation of the treaty, and being condemned for this action, he took refuge in Rome with his relatives, friends, and slaves, to the number of five thousand. To all these the Romans gave a place of habitation, and land to cultivate, and the right of citizenship. Claudius, on account of his brilliant exploits against the Sabines, was chosen a member of the Senate, and the Claudian gens received its name from him.
FROM PEIRESC Tarquinius incited the Sabines against the Roman people. B.C. 504 Claudius, an influential Sabine of the town of Regillus, opposed any violation of the treaty, and being condemned for this action, he took refuge in Rome with his relatives, friends, and slaves, to the number of five thousand. To all these the Romans gave a place of habitation, and land to cultivate, and the right of citizenship. Claudius, on account of his brilliant exploits against the Sabines, was chosen a member of the Senate, and the Claudian gens received its name from him. Y.R. 256B.C. 498 FROM SUIDAS The Latins, although allied to the Romans by treaty, nevertheless made war against them. They accused the Romans of despising them, although they were allied to them, and of the same blood. [Here follow, in the Teubner edition, four detached sentences, or parts of sentences, which, without their context, convey no meaning.]