hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Italy (Italy) 20 0 Browse Search
Rome (Italy) 14 0 Browse Search
Africa 10 0 Browse Search
1500 AD 9 9 Browse Search
Egypt (Egypt) 8 0 Browse Search
Carthage (Tunisia) 6 0 Browse Search
France (France) 6 0 Browse Search
Asculum (Italy) 6 0 Browse Search
1600 AD 5 5 Browse Search
Sicily (Italy) 4 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White). Search the whole document.

Found 21 total hits in 5 results.

ons well known to all, delivered an eloquent discourse, while serving as tribune, concerning the Italian race, lamenting that a people so valiant in war, and blood relations to the Romans, were declining little by little in pauperism and paucity of numbers without any hope of remedy. He inveighed against the multitude of slaves as useless in war and never faithful to their masters, and adduced the recent calamity brought upon the masters by their slaves in Sicily, where the demands of agriculture had greatly increased the number of the latter; recalling also the war waged against them by the Romans, which was neither easy nor short, but long-protracted and full of vicissitudes B.C. 133 and dangers. After speaking thus he again brought forward the law, providing that nobody should hold more than 500 jugera of the public domain. But he added a provision to the former law, that the sons of the present occupiers might
ly just, to deprive men of so many possessions they had held so long, including their own trees, buildings, and fixtures, a law was once Y.R. 387 passed with difficulty at the instance of the tribunes, that B.C. 367 nobody should hold more than 500 jugera of this land, th=sde th=s gh=s. "Of this land," the public land (ager publicus), not land in general. There has been much controversy over the question whether the agrarian laws of Rome were sumptuary laws intended to restrict the amount of landed property that one man could hold, or whether they applied only to the public domain, and this passage in Appian has played a large part in the controversy. M. Dureau de la Malle in his £Economie Politique des Romains (ii. 282 seq.) held that they were true sumptuary laws and he cited numerous authorities in support of the position. The most thorough examination of this question ha
by the usefulness of the work, and believing that nothing more advantageous or admirable could ever happen to Italy, he took no account of the difficulties surrounding it. When the time for voting came he advanced many other le, urgently importune Octavius in his present extreme danger not to prevent this most pious work, so useful to all Italy, and not to frustrate the wishes so earnestly entertained by the people, whose desires he ought rather to share corted home by the multitude as though he were the founder, not of a single city or race, but of all the nations of Italy. After, this the victorious party returned to the fields from which they had come to attend to this business. The deling bitterly, and saying that as soon as Gracchus should become a private citizen he would be sorry that he had done despite to the sacred and inviolable office of tribune, and had opened such a fountain of discord in Italy.
nor exactly just, to deprive men of so many possessions they had held so long, including their own trees, buildings, and fixtures, a law was once Y.R. 387 passed with difficulty at the instance of the tribunes, that B.C. 367 nobody should hold more than 500 jugera of this land, th=sde th=s gh=s. "Of this land," the public land (ager publicus), not land in general. There has been much controversy over the question whether the agrariangift. The word possessio in Roman law meant not ownership, but a seizing or sitting upon land. A Possessor was a squatter. The law referred to by Appian as having been formerly passed with difficulty was the Licinian law, B.C. 367. The Roman jugerum was about two-thirds of an acre. or pasture on it more than 100 cattle or 500 sheep. To ensure the observance of this law it was provided also that there should be a certain number of freemen employed on the fa
rism and paucity of numbers without any hope of remedy. He inveighed against the multitude of slaves as useless in war and never faithful to their masters, and adduced the recent calamity brought upon the masters by their slaves in Sicily, where the demands of agriculture had greatly increased the number of the latter; recalling also the war waged against them by the Romans, which was neither easy nor short, but long-protracted and full of vicissitudes B.C. 133 and dangers. After speaking thus he again brought forward the law, providing that nobody should hold more than 500 jugera of the public domain. But he added a provision to the former law, that the sons of the present occupiers might each hold one-half of that amount, and that the remainder should be divided among the poor by triumvirs, who should be changed annually. This was extremely disturbing to the rich because, on account of the triumvirs,