hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Xenophon, Works on Socrates 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Poetics 2 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 31-40 2 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 2 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for Syracuse (Italy) or search for Syracuse (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 62 results in 30 document sections:

1 2 3
Polybius, Histories, book 8, History of Universal Supremacy Must Be a Universal History (search)
thing unprecedented in the history of mankind. In what manner the Romans took Syracuse or Iberia may be possibly learned to a certain extent by means of such particu acquainted with universal history. . . . Hippocrates and Epicydes Take Over Syracuse Hieronymus succeeded his grandfather, Hiero, in B. C. 216, and was assassinatesans by descent, but born and brought up at Carthage, and who had been sent to Syracuse on a special mission by Hannibal,—were elected into the vacant places in the bSee Livy, 24, 30-31. and then took refuge in Leontini. Marcellus complained at Syracuse, but was told that Leontini was not within Syracusan jurisdiction. Marcellus, a mixture of force and fraud contrived soon afterwards to force their way into Syracuse, seize and put to death most of the generals, and induce the excited mob, whome, to elect them sole generals (Livy, 24, 29-32). The Romans at once ordered Syracuse to be besieged, giving out that they were coming not to wage war with the inha
Polybius, Histories, book 8, Syracuse's Defenses (search)
Syracuse's Defenses When Epicydes and Hippocrates had occupied Syracuse, Siege of Syracuse, B. C. 215-214. and had alienated the rest of the citizens with themselves from the friendship of Rome, the Romans who had already been informed of the murderSyracuse, Siege of Syracuse, B. C. 215-214. and had alienated the rest of the citizens with themselves from the friendship of Rome, the Romans who had already been informed of the murder of Hieronymus, tyrant of Syracuse, appointed Appius Claudius as Pro-praetor to command a land force, while Marcus Claudius Marcellus commanded the fleet. These officers took up a position not far from Syracuse, and determined to assault the town froSyracuse, appointed Appius Claudius as Pro-praetor to command a land force, while Marcus Claudius Marcellus commanded the fleet. These officers took up a position not far from Syracuse, and determined to assault the town from the land at Hexapylus, and by sea at what was called Stoa Scytice in Achradina, where the wall has its foundation close down to the sea. Having prepared their wicker pent-houses, and darts, and other siege material, they felt confident that, with sSyracuse, and determined to assault the town from the land at Hexapylus, and by sea at what was called Stoa Scytice in Achradina, where the wall has its foundation close down to the sea. Having prepared their wicker pent-houses, and darts, and other siege material, they felt confident that, with so many hands employed, they would in five days get their works in such an advanced state as to give them the advantage over the enemy. Archimedes. But in this they did not take into account the abilities of Archimedes; nor calculate on the truth that
Polybius, Histories, book 8, Siege of Syracuse (search)
Siege of Syracuse The attack was begun by Appius bringing his penthouses, and scaling ladders, and attempting to fix the latter against that part of the wall which abuts on Hexapylus towards the east. At the same time Marcus Claudius Marcellus with sixty quinqueremes was making a descent upon Achradina. Each of these vessels were full of men armed with bows and slings and javelins, with which to dislodge those who fought on the battlements. As well as these vessels he had eight quinqueremes in pairs. Each pair had had their oars removed, one on the larboard and the other on the starboard side, and then had been lashed together on the sides thus left bare. Sambucae or Harps. On these double vessels, rowed by the outer oars of each of the pair, they brought up under the walls some engines called "Sambucae," the construction of which was as follows:—A ladder was made four feet broad, and of a height to reach the top of the wall from the place where its foot had to rest; each side of the
Polybius, Histories, book 8, Other Inventions of Archimedes (search)
ad thus lifted the prow and made the vessel rest upright on its stern, he fastened the lever of his machine so that it could not be moved; and then suddenly slackened the hand and chain by means of a rope and pulley. The result was that many of the vessels heeled over and fell on their sides: some completely capsized; while the greater number, by their prows coming down suddenly from a height, dipped low in the sea, shipped a great quantity of water, and became a scene of the utmost confusion. Though reduced almost to despair by these baffling inventions of Archimedes, and though he saw that all his attempts were repulsed by the garrison with mockery on their part and loss to himself, Marcellus could not yet refrain from making a joke at his own expense, saying that "Archimedes was using his ships to ladle out the sea-water, but that his 'harps' not having been invited to the party were buffeted and turned out with disgrace." Such was the end of the attempt at storming Syracuse by sea.
Polybius, Histories, book 8, The Assault By Land Repulsed (search)
the end of their engines; for they used to lift the men, armour, and all, into the air, and then throw them down. At last Appius retired into the camp, and summoning the Tribunes to a council of war, decided to try every possible means of taking Syracuse except a storm. The siege turned into a blockade, B.C. 214. Coss. Q. Fabius Maximus IV. M. Claudius Marcellus III.And this decision they carried out; for during the eight months of siege which followed, though there was no stratagem or measure oufficient for so large a number as were within the town; they therefore relied upon this hope, and with their ships tried to cut off their supplies by sea, and with their army by land. But desiring that the time during which they were blockading Syracuse should not be entirely wasted, but that some addition should be made to their power in other parts of the country, the two commanders separated and divided the troops between them: Appius Claudius keeping two-thirds and continuing the blockade,
Polybius, Histories, book 8, Philip Takes Lissus in Illyria, B.C. 213 (search)
Philip Takes Lissus in Illyria, B.C. 213 Philip had long had his thoughts fixed upon Lissus and Lissus founded by Dionysius of Syracuse, B. C. 385. See Diod. Sic. 15. 13. its citadel; and, being anxious to become master of those places, he started with his army, and after two days' march got through the pass and pitched his camp on the bank of the river Ardaxanus, not far from the town. He found on surveying the place that the fortifications of Lissus, both on the side of the sea and of the land, were exceedingly strong both by nature and art; and that the citadel, which was near it, from its extraordinary height and its other sources of strength, looked more than any one could hope to carry by storm. He therefore gave up all hope of the latter, but did not entirely despair of taking the town. He observed that there was a space between Lissus and the foot of the Acrolissus which was fairly well suited for making an attempt upon the town. He conceived the idea therefore of bringing on
Polybius, Histories, book 8, Fall of Syracuse, B. C. 212 (search)
Fall of Syracuse, B. C. 212 He counted the layers; for as the The method taken by a Roman to estimate the height of the wall of Syracuse. Livy, 25, 23. tower had been built of regular layers of stone, it was very easy to reckon the height of the batSyracuse. Livy, 25, 23. tower had been built of regular layers of stone, it was very easy to reckon the height of the battlements from the ground. . . . Some days afterwards on information being given by a deserter that the Syracusans had been engaged in a public sacrifice to Artemis for the last three days; and that they were using very scanty food in the festival th to the license of the hour, and the short supply of food with their wine, he determined to attempt an escalade. Fall of Syracuse by an escalade, autumn B. C. 212. Livy, 24, 23-31. Two ladders of the proper height for the wall having been quickly madnto the wall, through which they admitted the general and the rest of the army. This is the way in which the Romans took Syracuse. . . . None of the citizens knew what was happening because of the distance; for the town isLivy, 25, 24. a very large o
Polybius, Histories, book 9, The Hannibalian War (search)
The Hannibalian War In the previous year (212 B. C.) Syracuse had fallen: the two Scipios had been conquered and killed in Spain: the siegeworks had been constructed round Capua, at the very time of the fall of Syracuse, i. e. in the autumn, Hannibal being engaged in fruitless attempts upon the citadel of Tarentum. See Livy, 25, 22. Entirely surrounding the position of Appius Claudius, B. C. 211. Coss. Gnaeus Fulvius Centumalus, P. Sulpicius Galba. The Romans were still engaged in the siege of Syracuse, i. e. in the autumn, Hannibal being engaged in fruitless attempts upon the citadel of Tarentum. See Livy, 25, 22. Entirely surrounding the position of Appius Claudius, B. C. 211. Coss. Gnaeus Fulvius Centumalus, P. Sulpicius Galba. The Romans were still engaged in the siege of Capua. Hannibal at first skirmished, and tried all he could to tempt him to come out and give him battle. But as no one attended to him, his attack became very like an attempt to storm the camp; for his cavalry charged in their squadrons, and with loud cries hurled their javelins inside the entrenchments, and the infantry attacked in their regular companies, and tried to pull down the palisading round the camp.Q. Fulvius and Appius Claudius, the Consuls of the previous year, were continued in c
Polybius, Histories, book 9, The Spoils of Syracuse: Works of Art Taken To Rome (search)
The Spoils of Syracuse: Works of Art Taken To Rome A city is not really adorned by what is brought from without, but by the virtue of its own inhabitants. . . . The Romans, then, decided to transfer these things to their own city and to leave nothing behind. Syracuse was taken in the autumn, B. C. 212. "The ornaments of the city, statues and pictures were taken to Rome." Livy, 25, 40, cp. 26, 21. Whether they were right in doing so, and consulted their true interests or the reverse, is a matteSyracuse was taken in the autumn, B. C. 212. "The ornaments of the city, statues and pictures were taken to Rome." Livy, 25, 40, cp. 26, 21. Whether they were right in doing so, and consulted their true interests or the reverse, is a matter admitting of much discussion; but I think the balance of argument is in favour of believing it to have been wrong then, and wrong now. If such had been the works by which they had exalted their country, it is clear that there would have been some reason in transferring thither the things by which they had become great. But the fact was that, while leading lives of the greatest simplicity themselves, as far as possible removed from the luxury and extravagance which these things imply, they yet
Polybius, Histories, book 9, Example: Why Nicias Failed at Syracuse (search)
Example: Why Nicias Failed at Syracuse Again Nicias, the general of the Athenians, had it in his power to have saved the army besieging Syracuse, and had selected the proper time of the night for escaping the observation of the enemy, and retiring to a place of safety. Nicias, B.C. 413. Thucyd. 7, 50. And then because the moon was eclipsed, regarding it superstitiously as of evil portent, he stopped the army from starting. Thanks to this it came about that, when he started the next day, the eSyracuse, and had selected the proper time of the night for escaping the observation of the enemy, and retiring to a place of safety. Nicias, B.C. 413. Thucyd. 7, 50. And then because the moon was eclipsed, regarding it superstitiously as of evil portent, he stopped the army from starting. Thanks to this it came about that, when he started the next day, the enemy had obtained information of his intention, and army and generals alike fell into the hands of the Syracusans. Yet if he had asked about this from men acquainted with such phenomena, he might not only have avoided missing his opportunity for such an absurd reason, but have also used the occurrence for his own benefit owing to the ignorance of the enemy. For the ignorance of their neighbours contributes more than anything else to the success of the instructed. Such then are examples of the ne
1 2 3