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Carthage (Tunisia) (search for this): book 11, chapter 24
en melted and fused. . . . Scipio on the Expulsion of the Carthaginians from Spain in Consequence of the Above Victory When every one complimented Scipio after he hadScipio's idea of transferring the war to Africa. driven the Carthaginians from Iberia, and advised him straightway to take some rest and ease, as having put a period to the war, he answered that he "congratulated them on their sanguine hopes; for himself he was now more than ever revolving in his mind how to begin the war with Carthage. Up to that time the Carthaginians had waged war upon the Romans; but that now fortune put it in the power of the Romans to make war upon them. . . ." Scipio's Visit to Syphax, King of Masaesylians See Livy, 28, 17, 18. In his conversation with Syphax, Scipio, who was eminentlyScipio's influence over Syphax. endowed by nature in this respect, conducted himself with so much kindness and tact, that Hasdrubal afterwards remarked to Syphax that "Scipio appeared more formidable to him in such a
Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): book 11, chapter 24
thered in the air, and a violent and prolonged torrent of rain descended, under which the Romans with difficulty effected a return to their own camp. . . . Many Romans lost their lives by the fire inThe Romans in the mining district of Spain. trying to get the silver and gold which had been melted and fused. . . . Scipio on the Expulsion of the Carthaginians from Spain in Consequence of the Above Victory When every one complimented Scipio after he hadScipio's idea of transferring the war to Africa. driven the Carthaginians from Iberia, and advised him straightway to take some rest and ease, as having put a period to the war, he answered that he "congratulated them on their sanguine hopes; for himself he was now more than ever revolving in his mind how to begin the war with Carthage. Up to that time the Carthaginians had waged war upon the Romans; but that now fortune put it in the power of the Romans to make war upon them. . . ." Scipio's Visit to Syphax, King of Masaesylians See Liv
Carthaginians Driven From Spain When these troops were at close quarters the elephants The elephants. were severely handled, being wounded and harassed on every side by the velites and cavalry, and did as much harm to their friends as to their foes; for they rushed about promiscuously and killed every one that fell in their way on, under which the Romans with difficulty effected a return to their own camp. . . . Many Romans lost their lives by the fire inThe Romans in the mining district of Spain. trying to get the silver and gold which had been melted and fused. . . . Scipio on the Expulsion of the Carthaginians from Spain in Consequence of the Above Victory When every one complimented Scipio after he hadScipio's idea of transferring the war to Africa. driven the Carthaginians from Iberia, and advised him straightway to take some rest and ease, as having put a period to the war, he answered that he "congratulated them on their sanguine hopes; for himself he was now more than ever