hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rome (Italy) 602 0 Browse Search
Italy (Italy) 310 0 Browse Search
Carthage (Tunisia) 296 0 Browse Search
Greece (Greece) 244 0 Browse Search
Spain (Spain) 224 0 Browse Search
Sicily (Italy) 220 0 Browse Search
Macedonia (Macedonia) 150 0 Browse Search
Peloponnesus (Greece) 148 0 Browse Search
Libya (Libya) 132 0 Browse Search
Syracuse (Italy) 124 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Polybius, Histories. Search the whole document.

Found 6 total hits in 1 results.

Lilybaeum (Italy) (search for this): book 1, chapter 45
Running the Blockade Himilco, the general in command at Lilybaeum, now A sally from Lilybaeum. saw that both divisions of his troops were in high spirits and eager for service,—the original garrison owing to the presence of the reinforcement, the newly arrived because they had as yet had no experience of the hardships of the situation. He wished to take advantage of the excited feelings of both parties, before they cooled, in order to organise an attempt to set fire to the works of the besiegeLilybaeum. saw that both divisions of his troops were in high spirits and eager for service,—the original garrison owing to the presence of the reinforcement, the newly arrived because they had as yet had no experience of the hardships of the situation. He wished to take advantage of the excited feelings of both parties, before they cooled, in order to organise an attempt to set fire to the works of the besiegers. He therefore summoned the whole army to a meeting, and dwelt upon the themes suitable to the occasion at somewhat greater length than usual. He raised their zeal to an enthusiastic height by the magnitude of his promises for individual acts of courage, and by declaring the favours and rewards which awaited them as an army at the hands of the Carthaginians. His speech was received with lively marks of satisfaction; and the men with loud shouts bade him delay no more, but lead them into the