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Situation in Illyria It was at this same period that the Romans for the first Illyricum. time crossed to Illyricum and that part of Europe with an army. The history of this expedition must not be treated as immaterial; but must be carefully studiedIllyricum. time crossed to Illyricum and that part of Europe with an army. The history of this expedition must not be treated as immaterial; but must be carefully studied by those who wish to understand clearly the story I have undertaken to tell, and to trace the progress and consolidation of the Roman Empire. Agron, king of the Illyrians, was the son of Pleuratus, andB C. 233-232. possessed the most powerful forceIllyricum and that part of Europe with an army. The history of this expedition must not be treated as immaterial; but must be carefully studied by those who wish to understand clearly the story I have undertaken to tell, and to trace the progress and consolidation of the Roman Empire. Agron, king of the Illyrians, was the son of Pleuratus, andB C. 233-232. possessed the most powerful force, both by land and sea, of any of the kings who had reigned in Illyria before him. By a bribe received from Demetrius he was induced to promise help to the Medionians, who were at that time being besieged by the Aetolians, who, being unable to persuIllyria before him. By a bribe received from Demetrius he was induced to promise help to the Medionians, who were at that time being besieged by the Aetolians, who, being unable to persuade the Medionians to join their league, had determined to reduce the city by force. Siege of Medion in Acarnania. They accordingly levied their full army, pitched their camp under the walls of the city, and kept up a continuous blockade, using ever
Acarnania (Greece) (search for this): book 2, chapter 2
consolidation of the Roman Empire. Agron, king of the Illyrians, was the son of Pleuratus, andB C. 233-232. possessed the most powerful force, both by land and sea, of any of the kings who had reigned in Illyria before him. By a bribe received from Demetrius he was induced to promise help to the Medionians, who were at that time being besieged by the Aetolians, who, being unable to persuade the Medionians to join their league, had determined to reduce the city by force. Siege of Medion in Acarnania. They accordingly levied their full army, pitched their camp under the walls of the city, and kept up a continuous blockade, using every means to force their way in, and every kind of siege-machine. But when the time of the annual election of their Strategus drew near, the besieged being now in great distress, and seeming likely every day to surrender, the existing Strategus made an appeal to the Aetolians. He argued that as he had had during his term of office all the suffering and the da
Situation in Illyria It was at this same period that the Romans for the first Illyricum. time crossed to Illyricum and that part of Europe with an army. The history of this expedition must not be treated as immaterial; but must be carefully studied by those who wish to understand clearly the story I have undertaken to tell, and to trace the progress and consolidation of the Roman Empire. Agron, king of the Illyrians, was the son of Pleuratus, andB C. 233-232. possessed the most powerful force, both by land and sea, of any of the kings who had reigned in Illyria before him. By a bribe received from Demetrius he was induced to promise help to the Medionians, who were at that time being besieged by the Aetolians, who, being unable to persuade the Medionians to join their league, had determined to reduce the city by force. Siege of Medion in Acarnania. They accordingly levied their full army, pitched their camp under the walls of the city, and kept up a continuous blockade, using every me
233 BC - 232 BC (search for this): book 2, chapter 2
Situation in Illyria It was at this same period that the Romans for the first Illyricum. time crossed to Illyricum and that part of Europe with an army. The history of this expedition must not be treated as immaterial; but must be carefully studied by those who wish to understand clearly the story I have undertaken to tell, and to trace the progress and consolidation of the Roman Empire. Agron, king of the Illyrians, was the son of Pleuratus, andB C. 233-232. possessed the most powerful force, both by land and sea, of any of the kings who had reigned in Illyria before him. By a bribe received from Demetrius he was induced to promise help to the Medionians, who were at that time being besieged by the Aetolians, who, being unable to persuade the Medionians to join their league, had determined to reduce the city by force. Siege of Medion in Acarnania. They accordingly levied their full army, pitched their camp under the walls of the city, and kept up a continuous blockade, using every m