hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rome (Italy) 602 0 Browse Search
Italy (Italy) 310 0 Browse Search
Carthage (Tunisia) 296 0 Browse Search
Greece (Greece) 244 0 Browse Search
Spain (Spain) 224 0 Browse Search
Sicily (Italy) 220 0 Browse Search
Macedonia (Macedonia) 150 0 Browse Search
Peloponnesus (Greece) 148 0 Browse Search
Libya (Libya) 132 0 Browse Search
Syracuse (Italy) 124 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Polybius, Histories. Search the whole document.

Found 2 total hits in 2 results.

nstrances ofThe influence of good men, Artaxias of Armenia. See 25, 2. Ariarathes did not do so, and held him on the contrary in higher respect than ever. So decisive is the influence of justice, and of the opinions and advice of good men, that they often prove the salvation of foes as well as of friends, and change their whole characters for the better. . . . Good looks are a better introduction than any letter. . . . The quarrels of the two kings of Egypt, Ptolemy VI. Philometor and Euergetes II. (or Ptolemy VII.) Physcon. The former had been expelled by the latter, and had taken refuge in Cyprus, but had been restored by a popular outbreak in his favour, and under the authority of Commissioners sent from Rome, B. C. 164. (Livy, Ep. 46. Diod. Sic. fr. xi.) Fresh quarrels however broke out, in the course of which Physcon was much worsted by his brother, (Diod. Sic. fr. of 31), and at length it was arranged that one should reign in Egypt the other in Cyrene. B. C. 162. (Livy, Ep. 47.)
nstrances ofThe influence of good men, Artaxias of Armenia. See 25, 2. Ariarathes did not do so, and held him on the contrary in higher respect than ever. So decisive is the influence of justice, and of the opinions and advice of good men, that they often prove the salvation of foes as well as of friends, and change their whole characters for the better. . . . Good looks are a better introduction than any letter. . . . The quarrels of the two kings of Egypt, Ptolemy VI. Philometor and Euergetes II. (or Ptolemy VII.) Physcon. The former had been expelled by the latter, and had taken refuge in Cyprus, but had been restored by a popular outbreak in his favour, and under the authority of Commissioners sent from Rome, B. C. 164. (Livy, Ep. 46. Diod. Sic. fr. xi.) Fresh quarrels however broke out, in the course of which Physcon was much worsted by his brother, (Diod. Sic. fr. of 31), and at length it was arranged that one should reign in Egypt the other in Cyrene. B. C. 162. (Livy, Ep. 47.)