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Smithfield (Washington, United States) (search for this): text disc, book 1
d obstinacy or laziness and slowness in moving himself like an ass, but he should be invincible through reason, reflection, meditation, study, and diligence. Who then is the invincible? It is he whom none of the things disturb which are independent of the will. Then examining one circumstance after another I observe, as in the case of an athlete; he has come off victorious in the first contest: well then, as to the second? and what if there should be great heat? and what, if it should be at Olympia? And the same I say in this case: if you should throw money in his way, he will despise it. Well, suppose you put a young girl in his way, what then? and what, if it is in the dark?From the rustics came the old proverb, for when they commend a man's fidelity and goodness they say he is a man with whom you may play the game with the fingers in the dark. Cicero, De Officiis, iii. 19. See Forcellini, Micare. what if it should be a little reputation, or abuse; and what, if it should be praise;
Seneca (New York, United States) (search for this): text disc, book 1
have pain in my head. Have you any pain in your horns? Why then are you troubled? for we only lose those things, we have only pains about those things which we possess.The conclusion explains what precedes. A man can have no pain in his horns, because he has none. A man cannot be vexed about the loss of a thing if he does not possess it. Upton says that Epictetus alludes to the foolish quibble: If you have not lost a thing, you have it: but you have not lost horns; therefore you have horns (Seneca, Ep. 45). Epictetus says, You do not lose a thing when you have it not. See Schweig.'s note. But the tyrant will chain—what? the leg. He will take away—what? the neck. What then will he not chain and not take away? the will. This is why the antients taught the maxim, Know thyself.Compare what is said in Xenophon, Mem. iv. 2, 24, on the expression Know thyself. Therefore we ought to exercise ourselves in smallThis ought to be the method in teaching children." things, and beginning with them t
n? To-morrow, I said, you will find an earthen lamp: for a man only loses that which he has. I have lost my garment. The reason is that you had a garment. I have pain in my head. Have you any pain in your horns? Why then are you troubled? for we only lose those things, we have only pains about those things which we possess.The conclusion explains what precedes. A man can have no pain in his horns, because he has none. A man cannot be vexed about the loss of a thing if he does not possess it. Upton says that Epictetus alludes to the foolish quibble: If you have not lost a thing, you have it: but you have not lost horns; therefore you have horns (Seneca, Ep. 45). Epictetus says, You do not lose a thing when you have it not. See Schweig.'s note. But the tyrant will chain—what? the leg. He will take away—what? the neck. What then will he not chain and not take away? the will. This is why the antients taught the maxim, Know thyself.Compare what is said in Xenophon, Mem. iv. 2, 24, on the e
Upton (Texas, United States) (search for this): text disc, book 1
om the rustics came the old proverb, for when they commend a man's fidelity and goodness they say he is a man with whom you may play the game with the fingers in the dark. Cicero, De Officiis, iii. 19. See Forcellini, Micare. what if it should be a little reputation, or abuse; and what, if it should be praise; and what if it should be death? He is able to overcome all. What then if it be in heat, and what if it is in the rain,The MSS. have u(ome/nos or oi)o/menos. Schweighaeuser has accepted Upton's emendation of oi)nwme/nos, but I do not. The sleep refers to dreams. Aristotle, Ethic, i. 13, says: better are the visions (dreams) of the good (e)pieikw=n) than those of the common sort; and Zeno taught that a man might from his dreams judge of the progress that he was making, if he observed that in his sleep he was not pleased with anything bad, nor desired or did anything unreasonable or un- just. Plutarch, peri\ prokoth=s, ed. Wyttenbach, vol. i. o. 12. and what if he be in a melanchol
Cicero (Illinois, United States) (search for this): text disc, book 1
ff victorious in the first contest: well then, as to the second? and what if there should be great heat? and what, if it should be at Olympia? And the same I say in this case: if you should throw money in his way, he will despise it. Well, suppose you put a young girl in his way, what then? and what, if it is in the dark?From the rustics came the old proverb, for when they commend a man's fidelity and goodness they say he is a man with whom you may play the game with the fingers in the dark. Cicero, De Officiis, iii. 19. See Forcellini, Micare. what if it should be a little reputation, or abuse; and what, if it should be praise; and what if it should be death? He is able to overcome all. What then if it be in heat, and what if it is in the rain,The MSS. have u(ome/nos or oi)o/menos. Schweighaeuser has accepted Upton's emendation of oi)nwme/nos, but I do not. The sleep refers to dreams. Aristotle, Ethic, i. 13, says: better are the visions (dreams) of the good (e)pieikw=n) than those of
Socrates (Georgia, United States) (search for this): text disc, book 1
it and wipe it; and for the sake of my oil flask, I drive a peg into the wall. Well then, are these things superior to me? No, but they supply some of my wants, and for this reason I take care of them. Well, do I not attend to my ass? Do I not wash his feet? Do I not clean him? Do you not know that every man has regard to himself, and to you just the same as he has regard to his ass? For who has regard to you as a man? Show me. Who wishes to become like you? Who imitates you, as he imitates Socrates?—But I can cut off your head.—You say right. I had forgotten that I must have regard to you, as I would to a feverFebris, fever, was a goddess at Rome. Upton refers to an inscrip- tion in Gruter 97, which begins Febri Divae. Compare Lactantius, De falsa religione, c. 20. and the bile, and raise an altar to you, as there is at Rome an altar to fever. What is it then that disturbs and terrifies the multitude? is it the tyrant and his guards? [By no means.] I hope that it is not so. It is not
Actium (Greece) (search for this): text disc, book 1
ndation o(/pou is good, but Schweighaeuser has not put it in his text: he has oi(= to\ a)gaqo\n tiqe/meqa. Matthew vi. 21, for where your treasure is, there will your heart be also. So these people show by thanking God, what it is for which they are thankful. A person was talking to me to-day about the priesthood of Augustus.Casaubon, in a learned note on Suetonius, Augustus, c. 18, informs us that divine honours were paid to Augustus at Nicopolis, which town he founded after the victory at Actium. The priesthood of Augustus at Nicopolis was a high office, and the priest gave his name to the year; that is, when it was intended in any writing to fix the year, either in any writing which related to public matters, or in instruments used in private affairs, the name of the priest of Augustus was used, and this was also the practice in most Greek cities. In order to establish the sense of this passage, Casaubon changed the text from ta\s fwna/s into ta\ su/mfwna, which emendation Schweigh
Nicopolis (Greece) (search for this): text disc, book 1
to me to-day about the priesthood of Augustus.Casaubon, in a learned note on Suetonius, Augustus, c. 18, informs us that divine honours were paid to Augustus at Nicopolis, which town he founded after the victory at Actium. The priesthood of Augustus at Nicopolis was a high office, and the priest gave his name to the year; that is,Nicopolis was a high office, and the priest gave his name to the year; that is, when it was intended in any writing to fix the year, either in any writing which related to public matters, or in instruments used in private affairs, the name of the priest of Augustus was used, and this was also the practice in most Greek cities. In order to establish the sense of this passage, Casaubon changed the text from ta\t on all such occasions, what will you do when you are dead? My name will remain.— Write it on a stone, and it will remain. But come, what remembrance of you will there be beyond Nicopolis?—But I shall wear a crown of gold.—If you desire a crown at all, take a crown of roses and put it on, for it will be more elegant in appea
Washington (United States) (search for this): text disc, book 1
rd to you as a man? Show me. Who wishes to become like you? Who imitates you, as he imitates Socrates?—But I can cut off your head.—You say right. I had forgotten that I must have regard to you, as I would to a feverFebris, fever, was a goddess at Rome. Upton refers to an inscrip- tion in Gruter 97, which begins Febri Divae. Compare Lactantius, De falsa religione, c. 20. and the bile, and raise an altar to you, as there is at Rome an altar to fever. What is it then that disturbs and terrifies thRome an altar to fever. What is it then that disturbs and terrifies the multitude? is it the tyrant and his guards? [By no means.] I hope that it is not so. It is not possible that what is by nature free can be disturbed by anything else, or hindered by any other thing than by itself. But it is a man's own opinions which disturb him: for when the tyrant says to a man, I will chain your leg, he who values his leg says, Do not; have pity: but he who values his own will says, If it appears more advantageous to you, chain it. Do you not care? I do not care. I will sh
Seneca (New York, United States) (search for this): text disc, book 1
se can there be one and the same principle in all animals, the principle of attachment (regard) to themselves? What then? when absurd notions about things inde- pendent of our will, as if they were good and (or) bad, lie at the bottom of our opinions, we must of necessity pay regard to tyrants; for I wish that men would pay regard to tyrants only, and not also to the bedchamber men.Such a man was named in Greek koitwni/ths; in Latin cubicu- larius, a lord of the bedchamber, as we might say. Seneca, De Constantia Sapientis, c. 14, speaks of the pride of the nomenclator (the announcer of the name), of the arrogance of the bedchamber man. Even the clerk of the close-stool was an important person. Slaves used to carry this useful domestic vessel on a journey. Horat. Sat. i. 6, 109 (Upton). How is it that the man becomes all at once wise, when Caesar has made him superintendent of the close stool? How is it that we say immediately, Felicion spoke sensibly to me. I wish he were ejected from
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